DGS Games

Tag Archives: Airboy

Revisiting “Secret of the Silver Blades”

Back to a classic Forgotten Realms setting ~

Avery Abernethy, 17 April 2017

Secret of the Silver Blades is the SSI Gold Box follow up to Pool of Radiance and Curse of the Azure Bonds. I recently replayed this on a modern computer and my thoughts are on playing this game in 2017, not 1990 when it was released.

I recently replayed this on a modern computer and my thoughts are on playing this game in 2017, not 1990 when it was released.

I enjoyed replaying Pool of Radiance and Curse of the Azure Bonds. Both had an interesting overall plot line that engaged me and kept me going through the long series of battles and leveling up my characters. Regretfully, Secret of the Silver Blades has such a poor plot that I could never really engage with it.

In Silver Blades your party (either imported from Azure Bonds or newly rolled-up) teleports naked to village. The village made a sacrifice to a teleporter and your group is hopefully the answer to the prayers of the village. The small town gives your group some pretty nifty equipment. They also heal, identify your magic goodies, and provide basic equipment for free every time you come back to town.

GrogHeads Reviews Appendix N

Review of “Appendix N: The Literary History of Dungeons and Dragons” from Jeffro Johnson ~

Avery Abernethy, 12 April 2017

Appendix N is the list of books in the first edition Dungeon Masters Guide that Gary Gygax referenced as primary influences on the development of Dungeons and Dragons. Jeffro Johnson secured these books and read them. Mr. Johnson had two goals for Appendix N. First, identifying how each novel inspired specific aspects of D&D and other early role playing games. Second, Jeffro’s observations on how each specific novel inspired an aspect of D&D and the enjoyment that a modern reader would have with these books which were published from the 1910s to the 1970s.

GrogHeads Reviews Order of Battle: Winter War

Airboy bundles up for a fight in the snow ~

Avery Abernethy, 1 April 2017

I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for Finland. The Finns were one of the few who repaid their World War 1 debts to the United States. I’ve had three enjoyable trips to Helsinki in the last thirty-five years. The Finns have good beer and you can take a “beer trolley” tour of Helsinki. “Hello” in Finland is “Hey” – the same way Auburn fans say hello to each other.

WinterWar-1 - Scenario 1 Intro

GrogHeads Reviews The Political Machine 2016

Is politics just a war by other means? ~

Avery Abernethy, 25 March 2017

The Political Machine 2016 is a light simulation of the 2016 Campaign for President of the United States by Stardock. The Political Machine debuted in 2004 and an updated version has been released for every subsequent US Presidential Election. The review is based on the 2016 simulation and I’ve not played the previous versions.

The game starts by selecting your avatar for the Presidency. You can select one of nineteen Democratic candidates, one of twenty-six Republican candidates, or build your own candidate. This is a two candidate race with no third party candidates. The leftist third party options are included with the Democrats (think Jill Stein) and the libertarian candidates are included with the Republican options (think Gary Johnson).

PolMach-game setup

Order of Battle Pacific: US Marines – AAR, Scenario 9 Part 2

The Marines are closing in on Japan.  Next up? Guam! ~

Avery Abernethy, 22 January 2017

Click images to enlarge

 

Taking the rest of Guam was slow work. East Guam is covered with jungle. It is easy to hide snipers, bunkers and entire infantry platoons in the jungle. Only infantry can dig the Japanese out of the jungle. On the East Coast and in Central Guam the Japanese concentrated their armor, anti-aircraft and better infantry units. More and better defenders slowed the advance there. But overall it is easier for the Marines to crush larger forces in the open than it is to root out smaller forces in dense jungle terrain.

Guam Turn 16 Pushing Forward

Guam Turn 16 Pushing Forward

Order of Battle Pacific: US Marines – AAR, Scenario 9 Part 1

The Marines are closing in on Japan.  Next up? Guam! ~

Avery Abernethy, 21 January 2017

Click images to enlarge

Guam is much larger than Saipan. There are two landing areas that are separated by considerable distance. My initial goals are to link up the two beach areas and then clear South Guam and the landing strip. After doing this I can move north.

 

1 - Next Target Guam

Next Target Guam

Order of Battle Pacific: US Marines – AAR, Scenario 8 Part 2

Now that the holidays are in the rearview mirror, Airboy’s battles through the Pacific continue  ~

Avery Abernethy, 8 January 2017

click images to enlarge

Scenario 8 – Saipan, continued

It took several turns to concentrate my artillery and take the heights in Central Saipan. But after that the Marines were a steam roller over the rest of Saipan. Fortunately the Japanese launched a late Banzai charge. It is easier to kill the Japanese out in the open while attacking than it is to dig them out of holes or root them out of hidden positions in the jungle. Southern and Central Saipan has much better defensive terrain than North Saipan which also helped the Marines.

Saipan Turn 13

Saipan Turn 13

 

Order of Battle Pacific: US Marines – AAR, Scenario 8 Part 1

Now that the holidays are in the rearview mirror, Airboy’s battles through the Pacific continue  ~

Avery Abernethy, 7 January 2017

click images to enlarge

Scenario 8 – Saipan

Saipan is huge compared to the Marshall and Gilbert Island targets. I used two landing zones because the city in the middle was too tough to take on D-Day. My initial objectives are: 1] link up the two landing zones; 2] seize the southern airfield; and 3] secure all Southern Saipan so I could fight on only one front. But achieving these three objectives was not easy. I continue my strategy of concentrating my forces and landing my artillery in a second wave.    The Japanese make multiple counter-attacks including several led by armor. It takes many turns to seize the southern airfield and land air support. It takes even longer to eliminate the Japanese snipers and infantry in Southern Saipan. The infantry allocated to eliminating resistance in the South never catch up to the main battle until the issue is decided. Much of my heavy artillery was allocated to the South and had to be shipped north. Central Saipan is mountainous which is excellent defensive terrain. The heights must be secured by infantry and the going was slow until I got all of my heavy artillery up from South Saipan.

Saipan D-Day

Saipan D-Day