The Zombie Apocalypse, Part 3: How do we kill them?

How do you kill what’s already dead? Jonathan Glazer, 17 July 2015 The last column More »

Birth of the Federation, an AAR, Part 14

CHAPTER XIV: WHY ARE WE USING ROMAN NUMERALS IN SPACE? We are exploring more and more More »

Classic Reviews: Enchanted Locations

Brant Guillory, 26 August 2015 Flip through it, and compare your needs to the price tag. More »

Tuesday Gaming Nostalgia – Combots

click images to enlarge While the GrogCast is on Summer vacation, we thought we’d bring More »

GameTalk: Scenario Design – Hypothetical engagements?

Byron Grant,  24 August 2015 Scenario Design – Hypothetical engagements? How many what-if scenarios do include More »

A Preview of Fog & Friction

Jim gets his paws on an early copy of Fog & Friction and tells us what More »

 

The Zombie Apocalypse, Part 3: How do we kill them?

Zombie-Grog-Box

How do you kill what’s already dead?

Jonathan Glazer, 17 July 2015

Z-ammunition-magazines-400x294The last column touched briefly on how to end the career of a Zed.  Now I will get more granular and detailed.  It is too simple to say something like “shoot them in the head”.  If it were just that simple, this column would not be necessary.  In reality, we tend to get overwhelmed by biters very easily.  During an outbreak, their numbers swell quickly and one’s position can be overrun in a matter of moments.  The problem is that they do not have a sense of fear.  Suppressive fire from heavy weapons makes normal people want to get out of the way and hide, which allows a flanking force to maneuver closer, set up fire lanes and lay down their own volume of suppressive fire.  This allows the first team to move into place and the process continues until both fire teams achieve their objective.  This is known as “Fire and Maneuver”.   Walkers do not respond to suppressive fire.  They simply wander into the withering wall of bullets and fall over (hopefully) allowing the ones behind them to do the same.  The problem is that the machine gunners eventually have to reload, or change overheated barrels or have a snickers.  And the undead hordes keep on moving closer.

Birth of the Federation, an AAR, Part 14

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CHAPTER XIV: WHY ARE WE USING ROMAN NUMERALS IN SPACE?

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We are exploring more and more of the vast galaxy we call home. And more and more systems are coming under our banner via colonization. So much so that I’ve stopped announcing each one, but because I’m a good person, I’m going to give you a bit of an overview of my systems and my fleet. Besides, it would be nice for me to know these things, being the leader of the Federation and all.

System-wise, the Federation (or more accurately at this point, the Terrans) occupy 14 systems, including Sol. Some are rather fat and bountiful; others are a bit thin, but not bad at all compared to the vanilla version of Birth of the Federation, where systems were sparse. It was like trying to find a free dollar in a whorehouse, or a surface without STDs in a Florida strip club. In other words, impossible. Just in case you didn’t get that.

Classic Reviews: Enchanted Locations

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Brant Guillory, 26 August 2015

Flip through it, and compare your needs to the price tag. But don’t just drop $30 on a book full of maps, because the B&W maps aren’t as useful as you might think, and the supporting information is sparse.

Yeah, it’s several years old, but I got it one summer at Origins. And there’s no review of it in the archives (ed note: “the archives” of the original site), so for a lot of you, Enchanted Locations may be new to you, too.

This book is from Fast Forward Entertainment, and was put together by James Ward, one of the “grandfathers” of the game. It is d20 compatible.

First Impressions

This book looks good. It chock full of maps, which gamers love. In truth, that’s one of the main reasons I grabbed it. I’m a map geek – a seriously cartography-addicted gamester. These maps are black and white, but detailed. There’s no index, but it really isn’t needed, since the table of contents covers all the big entries. However, an index might have been helpful to find specific treasures and/or encounters.

Digging In

Reading through the table of contents, you notice an imbalance of maps and encounters. Although there are about 75 maps spread across levels 2-21, there are very few low-level maps. I happen to like lower-level games; the balance of survival and heroism to me is more entertaining than power-blasting your way through every encounter.

Tuesday Gaming Nostalgia – Combots

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click images to enlarge

While the GrogCast is on Summer vacation, we thought we’d bring you some entertaining blasts-from-gaming’s-past with some classic print ads to conjure up some reminiscing.

Has anyone ever seen this actually on a game table, and not just in a discount bin?

Has anyone ever seen this actually on a game table, and not just in a discount bin?


 

Sound off below, or pop into our forums for a chat >>

GameTalk: Scenario Design – Hypothetical engagements?

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Byron Grant,  24 August 2015

Scenario Design – Hypothetical engagements?

How many what-if scenarios do include or want to see in a historical war game?

Should a game include plausible scenarios for engagements that did not occur, but could reasonably have happened?

Should a game include “build your own engagement rules”?

Any examples of “what if” scenarios you particularly liked / did not like?


Sound off below, or jump into our forums to say your piece >>

A Preview of Fog & Friction

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Jim gets his paws on an early copy of Fog & Friction and tells us what we’re in store for when the rest of us finally get our hooks into it.

Jim Owczarski, 22 August 2015

As an historical miniatures gamer down to my genome, I live for the spectacle of the gaming table.  In moments of weakness I have considered those willing to play on tables smaller than those used for ping pong a lesser breed of men and been dismissive of those games and rule sets than enable them.  With age comes wisdom, though, no matter what my wife would tell you, and I’ve grown to see the merits of games that offer a smaller footprint while still trying to offer a bit of what draws each of us to the hobby.  In this light, Pondfoot Games’ “Fog and Friction” (hereafter F&F) is a fine offering — it brings some of the toys, drama, and tension that make gaming the Second World War so appealing and lets you do it all on your kitchen table.

I’ll leave aside the fits and starts that this project has experienced as it’s tried to make its way to market (more here) and say that my remarks will confine themselves to the promo copy of the base set I received from the folks at Pondfoot.  The offering is simple enough:  two 60-card core decks, one each for the Axis and the Allies, and two 30-card expansion decks.  The game is non-collectible (first step towards toleration for me) but the designers hope to offer several expansion sets that will allow players to eventually fight in theaters other than the familiar terrain of Normandy represented in the base set as well as adding in new units and special cards.

Yep, decks of cards.  You were expecting model T-34s?

Yep, decks of cards.  You were expecting model T-34s?

GrogHeads Advanced Research on Projects Advisory #75

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Game accoutrements take center stage this week.  But don’t worry, we’ve got games, too!

Brant Guillory, 21 August 2015

Carolina Game Tables (Clint & Jodi Black)
$19k of $15k, ends 10 September 2015

Gorgeous, hand-crafted, drop-center game tables that pull double-duty as your dining room table are perfect for your gaming clan, uh… family.  Carolina Game Tables are a startup from a family that’s been in the furniture business for a few generations, and they’re putting that expertise to work for your benefit.  More affordable than the giant Geek Chic tables, Carolina Game Tables will hook you up with a great addition to your gaming life, but only in CONUS.  Sorry, Hawaii.  Drop your pledge on their Kickstarter campaign and then post the pics in our forums when it gets delivered and make us all jealous.

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Tank on Tank – First Look!

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LNLP reboots the Tank on Tank franchise with 2 new boxed games

Brant Guillory, 19 August 2015

Click images to enlarge

Lock’n’Load Publishing has brought back the Tank on Tank franchise, with the long-awaited East Front stand-alone game to accompany the previous version, now labeled as West Front.  What’s in the boxes?  Lessee…

The boxes are the standard LNLP "thin" boxes, which stack nicely on the game shelf alongside all their others.

The boxes are the standard LNLP “thin” boxes, which stack nicely on the game shelf alongside all their others.

edit: to clarify, when referring to the standard LNLP “thin” box, we’re referring to the height of the box, and not the thickness of the actual box material.  These things are pretty substantial, but are only about 1″ high.  They are not the paper-thin tuck boxes of LNLP days gone by.