GameTalk: England expects every man will play a naval game…

Byron Grant, 20 October 2014 Our weekly design discussions continue! Naval warfare games usually take two More »

Battle Lab – Mission Planning

Doug “panzerde” Miller, 18 October 2014 What happens when doctrinal planning meets your friendly neighborhood More »

A Visit With LNL Publishing – Old Roads Well Trodden

Jim Zabek, 17 October 2014 Following up his visit to Colorado, Jim drops some more More »

Birth of the Federation, an AAR, Part 8

CHAPTER 8: STILL WHERE NO MAN HAS GONE BEFORE click images to enlarge As space More »

GameTalk: Small-arms Ranged Combat

Byron Grant, 13 October 2014 Our weekly design discussions continue! Ranged combat is a simple enough More »

 

GameTalk: England expects every man will play a naval game…

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Byron Grant, 20 October 2014

Our weekly design discussions continue!

Naval warfare games usually take two forms: grand fleet or ship-versus-ship actions Games based on the latter pose a unique problem for game developers: how to keep track of the countless aspects of ship management. Things like ammo type, sail state, hull damage, fires, engine speed, turret direction, and boarding parties. Some designers eschew detail and resort to abstracts and percentages; others pile-on the detail until you can almost smell the oakum and tar. So what kind of naval gaming experience do you prefer? Any favorite or not-so-favorite examples?


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Breaking News: Panther Games signs with LNLP

20 October 2014

Lock’n’Load Publishing and Panther Games have both confirmed the news, and Panther Games’ next digital and tabletop releases will be with LNLP.  Yes, you read that right – LNLP is going to republish Panther Games’ original Trial of Strength boardgame.

Here’s a little something for you to ogle while the news sinks in…

The new Command Ops GUI

The new Command Ops GUI

Battle Lab – Mission Planning

BattleLab

Doug “panzerde” Miller, 18 October 2014

What happens when doctrinal planning meets your friendly neighborhood wargame?  This.

This summer I had the good fortune to spend most of a week hanging out at Origins with the Grogheads team. During that week I participated in and observed several sessions of the wonderful Staff Wargaming sessions run by Dr. James Sterrett and Mark Graves (USA Retired). I’m going to apply the planning approach we used during these sessions to the first US campaign scenario from Flashpoint Campaigns: Red Storm. I’m partial to doing this with Flashpoint Campaigns because it’s really perfect for this sort of planning. I thoroughly enjoyed meeting Jim Snyder and Rob Crandall of On Target Simulations at Origins and discussing the game with them as well as using it during the Staff Wargaming sessions. I’m going to run through the process of terrain analysis using OCOKA, develop several potential enemy Courses of Action (COAs) and then plan my defense based on those COAs. To begin with, lets get an overview of the battlefield.

 

An overview of the battlefield in Google Earth. The Soviets will be advancing from east of Buchholz toward the western edge of the map on the route to Bremen. Note that the game map stops on an east-west line just south of Schierhorn-Tostedt.

It’s time to do some terrain analysis. I’m going to use the OCOKA method, which stands for:

  1. Observation and fields of fire
  2. Cover and concealment
  3. Obstacles (and mines)
  4. Key Terrain
  5. Avenues of approach
Looking at the map above, the features that dominate the map are the town of Buchholz and the gap to the west through the line of hills running north and south. In considering Observation and Fields of Fire, observation east-west is pretty much constrained by that line of hills. There looks to be another line of hills to the west. Between the hill ranges is an open area. That area is most easily accessible (and can probably be somewhat observed) via Buchholz and the gap behind it.

A Visit With LNL Publishing – Old Roads Well Trodden

LNLP-new-splash

Jim Zabek, 17 October 2014

Following up his visit to Colorado, Jim drops some more Lock’n’Load news in our lap.

Click images to enlarge

Old Roads Well Trodden

Last week Grogheads published my initial take of a visit to LnL Publishing. Along with me, Dave Lowry also visited LnL Publishing and his article can be found on Clubfantasci.com. Between our articles a number of questions were raised by readers regarding the direction of the company. It is not the intention of this article to address every question raised, but rather to share additional information which should give readers a sense as to the overall direction LnL Publishing will take. Hopefully many of the questions out there will be given answers.

LnL Publishing’s roots are firmly established in traditional tabletop warming. Readers concerned that LnL might depart from those roots should rest at ease: all that printing equipment recently purchased is of little use to electronic games. Yes, LnL is interested in expanding its horizons into different genres and media, but gamers should rest assured that Mark Walker continues to work on boardgame designs.

What can gamers expect to see in the near future? I already hold in my hands (well, technically it’s in the chair next to me as I type) World at War Compendium 2. A reprint of Compendium 1 is also in my possession. Printed and sealed in a plastic bag, it lacks only counters, which have to be printed overseas, in order to ship out the door.

LNL-comV2-3

The new Compendium includes additional maps, along with the scenarios, counters, and AARs.

Birth of the Federation, an AAR, Part 8

BOTF-Splash

CHAPTER 8: STILL WHERE NO MAN HAS GONE BEFORE

click images to enlarge

As space has nothing BUT time while it passes…time, it’s been a while since the last AAR. Technically, I’ve been busy, but untechnically, I’ve been touring our newest colonies. MURICA. I mean, uhh, FEDER…uh…FEDERMURICA.

So anyway, let’s take a look at where we’re at right now. Shall we? Yes, let’s.

 

BOTF-8-001

Here’s our slice of the galaxy. We’ve explored…well, not much. Humans are lazy! I should start popping pills into their synthe-tribble ribs to make them move faster. Then again, we can only move as fast as my little Troop Transports and Colony Ships can carry my children. (I know I’m totally working up some delusions of grandeur, but when you technically have total control over an entire empire…well, stuff happens.)

Tuesday Screenshot: Planetside 2

RooksBailey, 14 October 2014

Forum member RooksBailey shares his adventures in Planetside 2 as he heads for cover when the enemy armor shows up

Forum member RooksBailey shares his adventures in Planetside 2 as he heads for cover when the enemy armor shows up


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GameTalk: Small-arms Ranged Combat

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Byron Grant, 13 October 2014

Our weekly design discussions continue!

Ranged combat is a simple enough concept – try to hit something that’s far away from you with some kind of projectile – but in practice, hitting your target and causing damage can be a difficult task. Many wargames don’t model things like rate of fire, ammunition supply, or effectiveness. At Agincourt, English longbows damaged but did not destroy the French knights (a fact which perhaps necessitated Henry V’s order to kill 1000’s of prisoners), and in recent wars, a 2011 report showed that US forces fired 250,000 rounds for every insurgent killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. So…is small arms ranged combat accurately represented in wargames? Does rifle fire kill more of your WWII counters, or is HE the real menace. Lock n’ load your comments.


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A Visit With LNL Publishing – The Overview

LNLP-new-splash

Jim Zabek, 11 October 2014

J-Z spent a few days hanging out with the LNL crew in Colorado.  There’s plenty more to come, but here’s a little wet your whistle.

Several months ago I chatted with Mark Walker, founder of Lock ‘n Load Publishing (since renamed to LNL Publishing – lnlpublishing.com) about the resent sale of Lock ‘n Load. In the interview Mark made it clear that he would still be the creative juggernaut behind his game series such as World at War, Nations at War, and of course the series which started it all, Lock ‘n Load.

 Click images to enlarge.  Really enlarge…

LNL's new lobby

LNL’s new lobby