LNLP - Nations at War

What’s Gus Playing, Episode 3

The pint-sized playa’ gets witchy on ya ~

Lloyd Sabin, 16 October 2017

The Witcher 3
Hearts of Stone

The Witcher 3 is still my go to game for almost any mood. Feeling like some creepy scares? Witcher 3. Want some eastern European-flavored dungeon spelunking? The Witcher 3. Scantily-clad fantasy women of all shapes and sizes? Again, Witcher 3.

So it was with some sadness that I completed the main quest a few months ago and shelved it for a few months. Enderal filed the gap for a while but then October hit (despite the 80-degree temps and hair-ruining humidity) and here I am again, needing a Witcher fix. I know there is a kind and loving gaming god because there are the DLC expansion packs Hearts of Stone and Blood and Wine. Blood and Wine is the equivalent of almost an entire other Witcher game, so I saved that and jumped in to Hearts of Stone earlier this week. And all those feelings came rushing back.

GrogHeads Reviews War in the Wind: The Battle for Attu Island, May 1943

The obscure WWII PTO shootout gets the GrogHeads once-over ~

Michael Eckenfels, 14 October 2017

In June of 1942, as part of the Midway attack plan, Japanese troops landed on the Alaskan islands of Attu and Kiska. These two inhospitable, mountainous islands were home to little but cold weather and leg-breaking slopes. The Japanese thought it prudent to occupy for…well, the reasons depend on what source you read. Some think they thought occupying part of a U.S. State would cause a tremendous morale drop among Americans; others thought it was meant to help ‘shield’ their northern flank, because both islands were closer to Japan than Alaska. Regardless of the reasons, the Japanese arrived, found little resistance, and after bombing Dutch Harbor to the east a few times, settled in for a long occupation.

American troops didn’t arrive until May 11, 1943, and were woefully unprepared for it.

That occupation lasted nearly a year. American troops didn’t arrive until May 11, 1943, and were woefully unprepared for it. The troops earmarked for the invasion were training in southern California for operations in the south Pacific – not for operations in near-Arctic mountainous conditions. The powers-that-be thought the attack would be brief, only lasting a few days, whereas when all was said and done, it took nearly three weeks. It might have taken longer had the Japanese not executed one of the biggest banzai charges of the war, costing them half their casualties. The number of troops they lost came close to 2400, with only 28 prisoners taken. The Americans suffered about 550 killed, 1200 wounded, and another 1800 or so wounded due to exposure, frostbite, trenchfoot, gangrene, and a number of other nasty, debilitating conditions. It was by no means a cake walk, though the result was inevitable.

GrogCast Season 5 Episode 14 – Wargames and Battlefields

13 October 2017 ~

Wait, no Mirth!?  Hell, we oughta just cancel the show without our co-host!

What’s that?  You guys want a GrogCast anyway?  OK, fine.  How about Cyrano and panzerde give us the lowdown on their recent travels to battlefields as far afield as Germantown and Leipzig?  How’s that work for you?  Let’s find out about their trips – What did they learn on the ground that changed their perspectives of their games?  How did their gameplay help get them ready for their trips?  What factors on the ground are unappreciated in the games?

What do we talk about?  Pub Battles, John Tiller’s WWI Squad Battles, multiple wargames from Marlboro and the Age of Reason, a couple of different Marengo games, the original Warfighter game, Jena-Auerstadt, some Napoleonic minis game whose terrain Jim hates, what the hell Brant was doing in East Berlin in 1986, and what glorious things printed catalogs are and why more game companies should publish them.

Yes, we’re still shamelessly begging for some ratings on iTunes, in our quest to get enough ratings to show up on their podcast recommendations.


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Gaming Nostalgia – The Courier Magazine

#TBT at GrogHeads!

Trying to recruit role-players by casting them as a great general in charge of minis army?  How’d that work out, eh?


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Tracer Rounds: What Do You Buy, Read, or Play?

Rapid fire thoughts about your game acquisitions ~

Brant Guillory, 11 October 2017

Plenty of us have a stack of wargames that we haven’t played yet. And quite frankly, there’s a not-insignificant portion of that stack that is, in all honesty, unlikely to ever get played. Occasionally, we’re just holding onto something in unpunched condition (ie, “investing”). Sometimes we got it, read thru it a bit, and decided we weren’t going to play it after all. But how many of us bought something with the express purpose of studying the game more than playing it?

What do you buy? What do you read or study? And what do you actually play?

That brings up a very interesting three-part question: What do you buy? What do you read or study? And what do you actually play?

In my case, I buy a lot of games from designers and companies I like to support (that said, I’m a bad comparison for “what do you buy?” because as the editor at GrogHeads and a regular reviewer of games, I don’t spend nearly as much on games as it might appear). But the games that I study and the games that I play do tend to diverge quite a bit.

What’s Gus Playing? Episode 2

The diminutive duke of danger is back ~

Lloyd Sabin, 9 October 2017

Alrighty here is the second installment of What’s Gus Playing? Covers Darkwood, why I pretty much sucked at it and why I am shelving it for now.

So it goes without saying that when summer ends and the weather finally cools, I get in to a spooky mindset.

You know me. Yes you. And that guy too. We’ve known each other for a long time. And you know that this time of year I love to scare the bejeezus out of myself. I mean, just look here at this thread – I didn’t even create it myself.

So it goes without saying that when summer ends and the weather finally cools, I get in to a spooky mindset. This season’s first attempt at PC gaming fear comes courtesy of Darkwood, a top-down perspective game developed with the Unity engine by Acid Wizard studios. Reading that last sentence, how could Darkwood NOT scare the crap out of most players?

Well I guess there is one way. Darkwood prides itself on not holding the player’s hand, and being merciless in its treatment of its players in general. I can corroborate this. I died, got hopelessly trapped and restarted the game…all more than once. This week, while trying to navigate Darkwood in the off-hours, was a rough one: long days at work, wife away, tons of chores and errands with the kids and I was also sick. So…it may not have been the best week to attempt a game that only wanted to crush me in its bony green fingers.

GrogCast Season 5 Episode 13 – Luke Hughes of Burden of Command

6 October 2017 ~

Mirth co-hosts a rambling discussion with Luke Hughes about the development of the new game Burden of Command and the ideas and inspirations behind the psychological and RPG-like parts of the game.

We’ve previously interviewed Luke about the game here on GrogHeads.  Now you get to listen to him explain it all in more detail.

Yes, we’re still shamelessly begging for some ratings on iTunes, in our quest to get enough ratings to show up on their podcast recommendations.


 Discuss this episode below, or pop into our forums to chat >>


Full podcast feed here, and iTunes feed here

Gaming Nostalgia – (Digital) Diplomacy

#TBT at GrogHeads!

Now you get stabbed in the back by the AI –  Progress!


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