Muzzy Lane - Making History: The Great War

GrogHeads Advanced Research on Projects Advisory #63

Gimme a G!  Gimme an A!  Gimme an ARRRRRR!  Gimme a P!  Gimme an A! More »

Prosciutto – Hamming it up with the di Parmas… 31!

Yep, we now have as many episodes as Baskin-Robbins serves flavors In Part 30 Benvenuto More »

Book Review: Strands of Sorrow

A Review of Strands of Sorrow by John Ringo By Avery Abernethy, 28 January 2015 More »

Last Day For Readers Choice Awards Voting

It’s your last chance to go vote in our Readers Choice Awards! More »

Nineteenth Century Military War Games: Charles Totten’s Strategos-The Advanced Game

Nineteenth Century Military War Games:  Charles Totten’s Strategos-The Advanced Game Robert Mosher, 24 January 2014 More »

 

GrogHeads Advanced Research on Projects Advisory #63

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Gimme a G!  Gimme an A!  Gimme an ARRRRRR!  Gimme a P!  Gimme an A!

 Click images to enlarge

Theomachy (Petersen Games)
$46k of $20k, ends 2 March 2015

Sandy Petersen, the brains behind Cthulhu Wars, is back with another supernatural smack-down.  Theomachy pits the multiverse of gods against each other (and the Cthulhuians, too!)  Ever wonder what would happen if the Egyptian and Norse deities clashed?  Well, you can dig out your vintage-1981 Deities & Demigods book, or you can hop on the Theomachy train and battle it out in this interesting card game with equal parts strategy, poker-style bluffing, and drop-dead-gorgeous artwork.  Power struggle?  Well yeah!  That’s pretty much the point, isn’t it?

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Prosciutto – Hamming it up with the di Parmas… 31!

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Yep, we now have as many episodes as Baskin-Robbins serves flavors

In Part 30 Benvenuto accidentally started a war with the Emir Of Galicia, won and lost the Succession War of Bari by fighting it for an ally and having to hand over the realm to him, chose the second best wife in Southern Europe for his son and heir, and at long last felt ready to carry out his father’s legacy and invade Sicily and claim the crown. In this part, a long war, Templars and the Emir of Galicia rides again.

 

CKII-Pic300The campaign for Sicily starts unremarkably, it is barely defended by the Muslims. To the east the army of Apulia walks off in a huff………

 

CKII-Pic301……and stops in Cosenza to start a war with Benvenuto. Busy in the south Benvenuto calls the mustachioed heroes of Bulgaria. ‘I’m sorry, the army you are calling is busy right now, Nikola and his band are pillaging Damascus, please leave a message after the tone and we’ll get right back to you’. Benvenuto calls his cousin in Lithuania and they promptly arrive, less moustaches, more furry boots.

Book Review: Strands of Sorrow

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A Review of Strands of Sorrow by John Ringo

By Avery Abernethy, 28 January 2015

Strands of Sorrow is the 4th and (claimed by the author) final book in Ringo’s Zombie Apocalypse series.  Wolf Squadron has manufactured the vaccination to the zombie apocalypse virus and has inoculated all of the US Navy crewmen on submarines. But everyone who became a zombie will stay a zombie. So almost all of the world’s population is either a zombie or was eaten by zombies.

With several thousand US servicemen, the US military, with civilian support, starts the initial operations to take back North America.  They start with some isolated military bases and eventually fight to retake Camp Lejeune in North Carolina – one of the primary training bases for the US Marine Corps. This starts an entertaining side story about the living hell of staying in US Marine Basic Training for almost a full year, unable to leave due to the zombie hordes. This leads to Ringo’s take on the difference between training officers, combat officers, and logistics officers.

Last Day For Readers Choice Awards Voting

2014RCAward-SPLASH

It’s your last chance to go vote in our Readers Choice Awards!

Tuesday Screenshot – Falling Stars: War of Empires

Hexes in Space!

LNLP, 27 January 2015

click to enlarge

Falling Stars - WOE2

LNLP’s upcoming Falling Stars: War of Empires peeks out through the Tuesday Screenshot curtain… not quite yet ready for the spotlight on the stage, but wanting to see what people think of the costume it’s wearing

 

bonus screenshot?  click on!

Happy Third Birthday, GrogHeads

We’re finally out of our terrible twos.

Three years ago, a bunch of knuckleheads were unhappy with the current state of their wargaming community, and they were just crazy (or stupid) enough to not know exactly what they were getting themselves into when one of them said “screw it – let’s just start our own site.”

GHlogo1cropOur forums opened for business three years ago today.  It took us a little longer to get organized enough to launch our front page – remember, we had no idea what we were getting into.  But we learned, we adapted, and we’ve grown.

And all of that is 100% attributed to our members, readers, and fans.  You guys have made this place what it is, and are what keeps it going every day.  It’s amazing to log in every day and see a wargaming community that shares a love of a hobby, and so many other common interests – music, movies, sports, technology, and more.

I can’t think of a better real-world summation of this place than what we saw last summer at Origins, when a group of Grogs showed up to help us run the GrogHeads Central Command, and despite none of them having met face-to-face, were clearly old friends who fell right into swapping tall tales at the bar between wargaming events and exhibit hall shenanigans.  And they’re all volunteering to come back and do it again this year.

GrogHeads is a success because of you, and we want to take the moment to pause on the journey to world domination to just simply say “thank you”.  You guys rock.


 

Tell us about your favorite GrogHeads moment below, or in our forums >>

Nineteenth Century Military War Games: Charles Totten’s Strategos-The Advanced Game

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Nineteenth Century Military War Games:  Charles Totten’s Strategos-The Advanced Game

Robert Mosher, 24 January 2014

Click images to enlarge

This is the third article in our series examining 19th Century war games designed and published primarily but not exclusively for the use of professional armies. The previous articles (here and here) discussed von Reisswitz’ Prussian Kriegsspiel (1824) and W.R. Livermore’s American Kriegsspiel (1882), respectively. This time, we look at Charles Totten’s Strategos, a contemporary design to Livermore’s game.

"Charles Adelle Lewis Totten, 1873." Photo courtesy of the USMA Special Collections & Archives.

“Charles Adelle Lewis Totten, 1873.” Photo courtesy of the USMA Special Collections & Archives.

In 1880 D. Appleton and Company of New York and then-First Lieutenant Charles A. Totten, (Fourth Artillery, United States Army), published STRATEGOS: A Series of American Games of War Based Upon Military Principles and Designed for the Assistance Both of Beginners and Advanced Students in Prosecuting the Whole Study of Tactics, Grand Tactics, Strategy, Military History, and The Various Operations of War. Strategos presented a layered set of games that addressed tactics, grand tactics, and strategy, supplemented by material for the study of military history, with an appendix that included statistical studies relating to the conduct of war.

Like his rival Walter Livermore (Class of 1865), Charles A. Lewis Totten graduated from the US Military Academy at West Point (Class of 1873). His father was Brigadier General James Totten (Class of 1841) and his uncle was Joseph Gilbert Totten (Class of 1805). Charles Totten ranked among the top ten cadets of his graduating class. His first posting, as a Second Lieutenant, was to the 4th Artillery and the garrison at Alcatraz Island, California, one of the forts protecting America’s Pacific Coast. His subsequent career included similar posts such as Fort Monroe, Virginia and the Artillery School there, and the Presidio in San Francisco. Other assignments were as Professor of Military Science and Tactics at the Massachusetts Agricultural College (now the University of Massachusetts) and later at Yale University, and as an instructor at West Point. Totten is still remembered in Massachusetts for his contributions as a founder of the fencing program while he was at Massachusetts Agricultural College. His field service included the Bannock Campaign (1878) and the Chiricahua Campaign (1880-1881).

During his military career he also published “Compensating Powder for Heavy Artillery” (1877), “Text Books and Tables”, and “Instructions in Guard Duty” (1887). His military lectures at Yale, including “Military Economy and the Policy of America” and “Organization, Dis-organization, Re-organization, and Mobilization” are available in a bound collection held in the Yale University Library.

GrogHeads Reviews Dragon Age: Inquisition

DAI-SPLASH

Kimberly Poet, 23 January 2015

Many dragons were harmed in the making of this review.

click images to enlarge (Images from Doug Miller)

Trilogies are tricky beasts. Much of their success depends not only on the original story, but also on its sequels. Dragon Age has had its share of ups and downs –  the promising epic RPG followed by a sequel which drew vitriol for its departure in tone and cobbled-together presentation.

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Dragon Age: Inquisition, however, not only exceeds its preceding games, it sets a new standard for Bioware entirely. The relatively open-world regions give you a chance to immerse yourself in Thedas and are both lush and diverse, from the moonlight deserts of the Hissing Wastes to the verdant tangle of the Emerald Graves. Crafting also makes its first appearance and allows you to tailor your character even further. The combat system is more fluid than Dragon Age: Origins and more strategic than Dragon Age 2. Its scope is broader, the relationships between the Inquisitor and their companions more intricately written, and the customization and graphics – sweet baby Andraste, if someone tells you they spent less than thirty minutes creating their character, they’re a filthy liar.

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