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Tag Archives: Industry

GrogHeads Central Command Location Revealed!

The secret is out ~

The GrogHeads Newsdesk, 8 June 2018

On the eve of our FIFTH time running the GrogHeads Central Command at Origins, we need to make sure everyone knows where to find us, since we’re still not labeled as “GrogHeads” in the site book

We’re pretty sure the big blue block behind us is the CABS Board Room, but we can’t independently confirm that.

So, come find us at the “War Gamers” area.  Yeah, we know.  We tried to get them to label it right.


Chat about it below, or in our forums, or hit our FaceBook page >>

Connections 2018 Announcement

This year’s professional wargaming conference ~

GrogHeads Newsdesk, 15 May 2018

This year’s professional wargaming conference, Connections, is being held at Ft McNair in Washington, DC 17-20 July.

Click to enlarge the flyer below for details.


Chat about it below, or in our forums, or hit our FaceBook page >>

GrogHeads Interviews Glenn Drover of Forbidden Games

FoG Glenn Drover is launching a new venture, and stops by to tell us all about it ~

Jim Owczarski, 24 March 2018

Glenn Drover has been in the game business for quite a few years now.  Despite an abiding love of historic gaming — notably in offerings like Napoleon in Europe and Victory and Glory: Napoleon — his biggest successes have been lighter fare including time spent at digital developer PopCap.  Earlier this week, he and fellow PopCap alum announced a new venture — Forbidden Games.  It seemed like a logical time to do a little catching up.

So, for the six people reading this who don’t know you, what were the last three games — digital, tabletop or otherwise — you were involved with?

The last three games that I worked on that were published were:

  • Victory & Glory: Napoleon, a lighter grand strategy game of the Napoleonic Wars for the PC, published by Matrix  (Note: I finally finished the board game version, which will be shipping in April, published by Forbidden)
  • Galactic Rebellion, a sequel (of sorts) to Age of Empires III: The Age of Discovery, published by Eagle Games
  • WarQuest, a fantasy strategy game (with amazing miniatures) inspired by Divine Right, published by Mr. B Games

2017 Readers Choice Award Voting

Have your say about your favorite 2017 games ~

GrogHeads Staff, 17 March 2018

It’s time to get your votes in for the Readers’ Choice Awards for game-year 2017. Yes, we know we’re running about 2 months late on this. But hey, we’re not nearly as far behind as the Charlies!

The only required items are the overall digital / tabletop games, at the end of each of those categories, and there is an “opt-out” option available for those of you that don’t play that type of game.


Chat about it below, or in our forums, or hit our FaceBook page >>

Some Thoughts on Kickstarter Financial Benefits and Risks

Is the risk worth the reward? ~

Avery Abernethy, 27 February 2018

Kickstarter has provided significant start-up funds for many gaming projects. Pillars of Eternity raised almost $4 million dollars. The 7th Edition of Call of Cthulhu raised over $561,000 and many smaller PC, boardgame, and tabletop games raised enough money to fund their project. But for individuals, funding a kickstarter game project is fraught with risk. There are no guarantees that a funded project will be completed either on time or ever. Kickstarter itself does not guarantee that projects are legitimate or that they will be completed. There are a number of horror stories about funded Kickstarter projects which never completed their project and ultimately returned nothing to backers.

From a financial perspective, how can you decide if contributing to a Kickstarter Campaign is a good bet? I’ve recently helped fund a couple of kickstarter projects after overcoming extraordinary levels of apprehension. I’ve got a few thoughts on how to consider a decision to fund a Kickstarter game project.

 

The Unavoidable Risk Is Huge

Even a casual reading of Kickstarter’s legal language shows Kickstarter itself does not stand behind any funded project in any way. They do not promise that a funded project will be: competed; completed on time; or completed in a manner consistent with the project’s promotion. Kickstarter’s policies have been tested in US courts. Legally, if you pay into a funded Kickstarter project and the project fails, your only recourse is suing people responsible for the individual Kickstarter project. Good luck collecting from a failed funded project. If an individual or a company does not have any assets, you will not collect anything even with successful lawsuit. The conclusion I draw from this is pretty simple. Don’t fund a Kickstarter project if you are unable to accept the risk of losing 100% of your pledge.