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Tag Archives: History

2018 – Looking Ahead to the Next Year in Wargaming

We also asked folks in the hobby to look into the next year and take a stab at predicting the future –

GrogHeads, 30 December 2017

Ty Bomba, Game Designer

I’m taking part in the founding of a new, 116-page, quarterly, one-topic-per-issue magazine from S&T Press to be titled Strategy & Tactics Quarterly. At least at the start, there won’t be any issue-wargame inside; instead there will be a full-size, two-sided, frame-able poster. At the same time, the 116-page format will allow us to get into each issue’s topics in such depth that most wargamers won’t be able to resist getting into them. My first two issue contributions will be: Stalingrad: The Whole Story, and Cold War World Wars: Armageddon’s that Might’ve Been, 1945-1991. 

Alan Emrich, Victory Point Games

I predict the hobby will soldier on, but with a continuing need for more introductory wargames on topics that will send new players to learn more about the battles, campaigns, and personalities. Since they don’t do justice to history in schools as they used to, lighting that fire of passion in the next generation is vital.

2017 – Looking Back on the Year in Wargaming

We asked folks in the hobby what their biggest personal accomplishment was this past year.  Here’s what we got from them –

GrogHeads, 23 December 2017

Iain McNeil, Slitherine

That’s a tricky one as it depends if I use my business hat or my gamer hat. Battlestar Galactica Deadlock has been a huge project for us and is going really well on PC and just released on console, but from a personal point of view I love Field of Glory II. It’s not as commercial as BSG but I’m very pleased with how it has turned out and still enjoy playing when I get the time.

Stronghold Games

SURVIVING this year is my biggest accomplishment!  28 releases for a small company is rather astonishing.  And also moving operations for Stronghold Games (and my residence) to Florida made this year very challenging to say the least.

However, if that’s copping out, then I’ll go with Terraforming Mars.  While released in the latter half of 2016, the success of the game was truly realized in 2017.  Getting out two expansions in 2017, “Terraforming Mars: Hellas & Elysium” and “Terraforming Mars: Venus Next” (releasing on 12/31/17 worldwide!), solidified its stature as one of the most significant hobby game releases of all time.  Terraforming Mars is now ranked #6 (soon to be #5) on BoardGameGeek.com.

Dragon’ Up The Past – Week 9, Eastern Wanderings and AD&D2E

Just how many editions ago? ~

Brant & Jim, 22 December 2017

Looking ahead to Second Edition, as well as exploring the options for Eastern adventures, and small-press good/bad ideas.

We’ve got plenty more where this one came from – there’s 192 issues still to go!

Chat about it below, or in our forums, or hit our FaceBook page >>

TANKSgiving – Tanks and Armored Cars 1919-1939

Another gallery from a visit to Bovington  ~

Avery Abernethy, 20 November 2017

The tanks used in World War 1 were monstrous beasts that stood well over the ground. Most carried machine guns or at best very light cannons. After 1918 the industrial powers realized that anti-tank guns (and even anti-tank rifles) could easily knock out a WW1 era tank because of its thin armor, weak engine, slow speed and very high gun profile.

Much of the interwar period saw the development of Armored Cars and light tanks. Armored cars were much faster than the WW1 era tanks (especially on roads) and carried either similar or heavier guns than WW1 tanks. Thus the armored cars were faster, lower to the ground, less expensive to build, easier to maintain, and had more firepower than a WW1 tank.

Many armored cars were developed immediately after World War 1 through the early 1930s. As they developed, they became lower to the ground.

The development split into three directions.

In one direction the gun was removed and it became a scout car.  An example is the Dingo Mark 3.

Battle Lab: Why Logistics Sucks

Why logistics so rarely shows up in wargames ~

Brant Guillory, 25 October 2017

Here’s a logic puzzle for you.

You have 4 snakes that have to get through a maze. They each have a destination, but there are only 3 start points and only 3 endpoints. Oh, and the routes through the maze cross in several places, which means you have to sequence your snakes through the maze. And by the way, there is a certain sequence the snakes need to depart and arrive.

Does your head hurt yet? What if we started putting some obstacles in the maze? How about if the snakes stop off for a bite to eat? What if we start including snakes going the other direction, too? Some passageways are too small for some snakes, do you route them through those pathways to free up space for other snakes even if the smaller ones now take longer to get where they’re going?