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Tag Archives: Brant

Dragon’ Up The Past – Week 4, Mano-a-Mano

Hey, someone is listening, right? ~

Brant & Jim, 17 November 2017

Man-to-man combat takes center stage in this episode, as we explore the roots of gaming through the lens of old issues of Dragon Magazine

Don’t worry, there’s plenty more where this one came from – there’s 197 issues still to go!


Chat about it below, or in our forums, or hit our FaceBook page >>

Dragon’ Up The Past – Week 3, Gary was pissed

Waaaaaay back into the vault for this one ~

Brant & Jim, 10 November 2017

Slip on your bell-bottoms as we go way back to an old issue of Dragon Magazine, and check out 1970s-vintage wargaming awards, a very angry editorial from Gary Gygax, a textual hype-man, and the first appearance of the Ninja NPC.

Don’t worry, there’s plenty more where this one came from – there’s 198 issues still to go!


Chat about it below, or in our forums, or hit our FaceBook page >>

Dragon’ Up The Past – Week 2, Voting on the Classics

It’s time for some more explorations into the history of the hobby ~

Brant & Jim, 3 November 2017

Another trip into the Dragon Magazine archives, as we skip around the history of the hobby.

Don’t worry, there’s plenty more where this one came from – there’s 199 issues still to go!


Chat about it below, or in our forums, or hit our FaceBook page >>

Dragon’ Up The Past – Week 1, Boodles!

A new feature that takes a deep dive into the history of the hobby ~

Brant & Jim, 27 October 2017

Take a spin through the archives of the hobby gaming world, as Brant and Jim peruse the back catalog of Dragon Magazine

Don’t worry, there’s plenty more where this one came from – there’s 200 issues still to go!


Chat about it below, or in our forums, or hit our FaceBook page >>

Battle Lab: Why Logistics Sucks

Why logistics so rarely shows up in wargames ~

Brant Guillory, 25 October 2017

Here’s a logic puzzle for you.

You have 4 snakes that have to get through a maze. They each have a destination, but there are only 3 start points and only 3 endpoints. Oh, and the routes through the maze cross in several places, which means you have to sequence your snakes through the maze. And by the way, there is a certain sequence the snakes need to depart and arrive.

Does your head hurt yet? What if we started putting some obstacles in the maze? How about if the snakes stop off for a bite to eat? What if we start including snakes going the other direction, too? Some passageways are too small for some snakes, do you route them through those pathways to free up space for other snakes even if the smaller ones now take longer to get where they’re going?

Tracer Rounds: What Do You Buy, Read, or Play?

Rapid fire thoughts about your game acquisitions ~

Brant Guillory, 11 October 2017

Plenty of us have a stack of wargames that we haven’t played yet. And quite frankly, there’s a not-insignificant portion of that stack that is, in all honesty, unlikely to ever get played. Occasionally, we’re just holding onto something in unpunched condition (ie, “investing”). Sometimes we got it, read thru it a bit, and decided we weren’t going to play it after all. But how many of us bought something with the express purpose of studying the game more than playing it?

What do you buy? What do you read or study? And what do you actually play?

That brings up a very interesting three-part question: What do you buy? What do you read or study? And what do you actually play?

In my case, I buy a lot of games from designers and companies I like to support (that said, I’m a bad comparison for “what do you buy?” because as the editor at GrogHeads and a regular reviewer of games, I don’t spend nearly as much on games as it might appear). But the games that I study and the games that I play do tend to diverge quite a bit.

Classic Reviews – Red Dragon Inn

The only thing that’s more fun than drinking, gambling, and rough-housing in a medieval tavern in a laughter-inducing game about drinking, gambling, and rough-housing in a medieval tavern. ~

Brant Guillory, 6 September 2017

With a learning curve that’s somewhere between “simple” and “duh”, and a playing time of 30-60 minutes (published and actual), it’s quick, easy, fun, usually hilarious.  But with only four characters might get stale for as often as you’ll want to play it

So you and your friends either slayed an evil beast, or conquered the local warlord? Both? Well done, you! Time to celebrate, quaffing pints and regaling your friends with tall tales of your exploits over at the Red Dragon Inn. You goal is to be the last one standing among the carousing adventurers at the inn, which is not an easy feat when you’re subsisting on a diet of Dragon Breath Ale.

Each player has a playmat that organizers the cards in play, and tracks both the character’s alcohol level, and fortitude. The goal is to keep the alcohol content low, and the fortitude high; should they meet, the character falls unconscious and the rest of the party splits the loot. Speaking of loot – should you run out of loot, the inn tosses you out on your heels. In either case, you’re out of the game. The last conscious player standing, with cash, is the winner.

GrogHeads Analyzes Aftershock: A Humanitarian Crisis Game

Professional development through better gameplay? ~

Brant Guillory, 12 August 2017

The first tremors hit Carana around 415 in the morning, local time. The capital was just stirring as many laborers were hurrying through their pre-dawn meals before shuffling out of their small houses to arrive at work by sunrise. The full brunt of the earthquake arrive 20 minutes or so later, and the devastation was described by at least one news outlet as “biblical.” The nations tenuous infrastructure, barely a patchwork to begin with, had no chance against the fury unleashed by the Earth’s shifting tectonic plates as bridges crumbled, roads buckled, water pipes tore apart like paper, and the electrical grid shut down, ending any communication that was out of shouting distance.

The full brunt of the earthquake arrive 20 minutes or so later, and the devastation was described by at least one news outlet as “biblical.”

Help was slow in arriving. Certainly the help wanted to arrive, but the routes into the country – the limited airport, the ramshackle seaport, and inland border – were never ideal under perfect circumstances, and these were not perfect circumstances. The local population certainly had a will to survive, but lacked critical supplies for medical care, safe water, and food & shelter. The world mobilized to help.

And the help began to arrive, a multi-headed hydra of organizations, services, expertise, and agendas. Usually cooperative, occasionally antagonistic, and always under the steady gaze of the worlds’ TV cameras, the various organizations rolled up their sleeves to start the long, hard slog of restoring the basic necessities of life to Carana.