Author Topic: Nexus Ops - Components Review  (Read 1733 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline son_of_montfort

  • Ego rex Jerusalem et Sicilie, comitatus Provincie et Folcalquierii
  • Crossbowman
  • *
  • Posts: 5803
  • The Electronic Eremite
Nexus Ops - Components Review
« on: January 28, 2012, 09:26:25 PM »
Until the front page is set up to accommodate links and videos, I will link my recent components review of the Fantasy Flight Games reprint of Nexus Ops.

A little up front history, Nexus Ops is a classic-style "dudes-on-a-map" genre board game that is a bit like a quicker playing and simplified Axis & Allies (in that it uses tiered, asymmetric units). Originally published by Avalon Hill, the rights were purchased by Fantasy Flight since AH's unfortunate demise. This is the reprint, and Fantasy Flight has injected its regular high-quality level into what is widely lauded as a favorite in casual wargaming.

http://youtu.be/9h_YEI_-0i0
"Now it is no accident all these conservatives are using time travel to teach our kids. It is the best way to fight back against the liberal version of history, or as it is sometimes known... history."

- Stephen Colbert

"The purpose of religion is to answer the ultimate question, are we in control or is there some greater force pulling the strings? And if the courts rule that corporations have the same religious rights that we humans do, I think we’ll have our answer."

- Stephen Colbert


Offline Arctic Blast

  • Landsknecht
  • *******
  • Posts: 5856
  • Friends, countrymen, lend me your ales!
Re: Nexus Ops - Components Review
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2012, 01:57:30 AM »
I'm definitely interested in a quick pick up and play 'Dudes on a Map' type game. But, man...that tile art is a bit nasty looking.

Offline son_of_montfort

  • Ego rex Jerusalem et Sicilie, comitatus Provincie et Folcalquierii
  • Crossbowman
  • *
  • Posts: 5803
  • The Electronic Eremite
Re: Nexus Ops - Components Review
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2012, 09:22:55 AM »
I'm definitely interested in a quick pick up and play 'Dudes on a Map' type game. But, man...that tile art is a bit nasty looking.

Actually, it is fairly attractive in real life. Also, the important part of the tile art in Nexus Ops is the color, the type of terrain only effects certain units and usually only in movement or other ways (i.e. no complex terrain modifiers like in a hex wargame).

Nexus Ops is a pretty classic-style dudes on a map - only a little more complicated than Risk, faster playing than risk, asymmetric units like in Axis & Allies but much less complex than A&A. The big draw comes from the secret mission cards, which are essentially how you win. You get these missions that might say "win a battle using only crystaline forces" or "kill at least one humanoid soldier in a battle." So your warfare and strategy is determined by the goals you are given. It also makes the game proceed fairly quickly and not devolve into a "turtle until I get enough dudes to crush the other side." Strike forces to achieve goals are common. I like this, because games like Risk can often become slogs as you build up just to massively expand in one turn.

Speaking of Risk... If you want something completely different in the "Dudes-on-a-map" genre, you might look into Risk Legacy. Particularly if you play with the same 4-5 people regularly. The idea behind Risk Legacy is that every game effects subsequent games; meaning that you alter the board physically as a result of game's outcome. You get a pile of stickers and you need to have a permanent marker handy - because you will be putting out "scars" that effect rolls (i.e. defenders get -1 or attackers get +1) and when you win, you get to put out cities on the board, name continents, and stuff like that. It is really cool, in our game, we happened to put defensive bunkers in the entry points to North America, making it harder to break into the continent. Your game will be completely different... depending on your players. After about 15 games, the board will be mostly "set" and will represent how your group decided to customize the game.

They have also made the Risk victory conditions much more streamlined through a "red star" point system. You get stars for taking opponents capitals or by trading in cards. This means your games only go for about 30 minutes to an hour (our first game actually only went 15 minutes due to some fancy footwork on my part). That makes the game so much more playable than the old Risk.

Also fun, there are "packets" of cards that you only open and add to the game once certain objectives have been achieved (i.e. three nukes have been used in a battle or a player has gotten completely wiped out). We are just itching to open these, but haven't gotten the objective yet.

For a quick casual game, Risk Legacy is innovative (due to the physical altering of the board) and fun. It isn't a brain burner by any means, but you can pop some beers and laugh about how your friend named Australia "Bonertopia" or something.
"Now it is no accident all these conservatives are using time travel to teach our kids. It is the best way to fight back against the liberal version of history, or as it is sometimes known... history."

- Stephen Colbert

"The purpose of religion is to answer the ultimate question, are we in control or is there some greater force pulling the strings? And if the courts rule that corporations have the same religious rights that we humans do, I think we’ll have our answer."

- Stephen Colbert

Offline Arctic Blast

  • Landsknecht
  • *******
  • Posts: 5856
  • Friends, countrymen, lend me your ales!
Re: Nexus Ops - Components Review
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2012, 12:49:04 AM »
I'm definitely interested in a quick pick up and play 'Dudes on a Map' type game. But, man...that tile art is a bit nasty looking.

Actually, it is fairly attractive in real life. Also, the important part of the tile art in Nexus Ops is the color, the type of terrain only effects certain units and usually only in movement or other ways (i.e. no complex terrain modifiers like in a hex wargame).

Well, if it actually works when it's set up on the table, that's what matters.

Quote
Speaking of Risk... If you want something completely different in the "Dudes-on-a-map" genre, you might look into Risk Legacy. Particularly if you play with the same 4-5 people regularly. The idea behind Risk Legacy is that every game effects subsequent games; meaning that you alter the board physically as a result of game's outcome. You get a pile of stickers and you need to have a permanent marker handy - because you will be putting out "scars" that effect rolls (i.e. defenders get -1 or attackers get +1) and when you win, you get to put out cities on the board, name continents, and stuff like that. It is really cool, in our game, we happened to put defensive bunkers in the entry points to North America, making it harder to break into the continent. Your game will be completely different... depending on your players. After about 15 games, the board will be mostly "set" and will represent how your group decided to customize the game.


Oh, I've already got this one. Our group is tied up in several different RPG campaigns right now, but once some regular game space clears up we'll start playing this.  :D