Author Topic: NFL Team Recommendation for an Australian to follow and support.  (Read 7846 times)

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Offline BanzaiCat

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Re: NFL Team Recommendation for an Australian to follow and support.
« Reply #45 on: September 19, 2017, 09:01:34 AM »
College football might arguably do better with a Premiere League-type structure, but there would be endless quibbling over whom goes where or how the various divisions are ranked (SEC > Big 12?).

Offline bayonetbrant

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Re: NFL Team Recommendation for an Australian to follow and support.
« Reply #46 on: September 19, 2017, 09:02:39 AM »
do better with a Premiere League-type structure

can't do it w/o a single table structure, otherwise you're stuck moving people between divisions / leagues
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Offline BanzaiCat

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Re: NFL Team Recommendation for an Australian to follow and support.
« Reply #47 on: September 19, 2017, 09:04:02 AM »
If it makes sense, the NCAA will avoid it like the plague.

Offline BanzaiCat

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Re: NFL Team Recommendation for an Australian to follow and support.
« Reply #48 on: September 20, 2017, 03:10:06 PM »
I actually found all of my old Fantasy Football articles, including my League History pieces. I haven't laid eyes on these since 2003.

Here's an excerpt from the first part of the first article. I feel like I'm reading someone else's words even though I know I wrote this. It's really weird.

Quote
        A hush fell over the crowd that I held in my deep oaken arms. A yellowed field of grass flowed over the center, splashing against the walls and railings that the fans held to, spellbound by the actions on the field. Jim Thorpe, resplendent in a Canton Bulldogs uniform (he also happened to be their coach) trotted onto the field to try a hand at kicking the game-winning field goal. The score had been tied at 0-0 all day, the back-and-forth tumblings of men and dirt governed only by their own stratagems, the hazy sun above oblivious to all it shone on. Thorpe nonchalantly kicked the ball through the uprights, giving the Bulldogs a 3-0 lead and a victory over the Massilon Tigers.
   
        My grasp saw many other games, but eventually I fell into disuse and disrepair. The ebb and flow of professional football in Canton, Ohio, came and went over the years as teams went bankrupt as often as they sprouted up. Even though my town didn’t hold an NFL team for long, I can at least be proud that, not but a few hundred yards down the way there, is the Football Hall Of Fame.
   
        Jim Thorpe was one of the first to be inducted into its gleaming, honorable halls.


   Jim Thorpe was one of the omnipresent athletes of his day; he could kick, run, throw, and catch, where most of his caliber could only do one or two well. He could out-juke anybody on the field, and if they did decide to make contact with him, Thorpe could rely on a secret (if illegal) weapon: his shoulder pads were coated with sheet metal, concealed under his jersey. Would-be tacklers often didn’t get up again, and if they did they thought twice about trying to take Thorpe on again. In 1925, when he joined the New York Giants, they managed to get it into his head that having such ‘Mad Max’ style killing implements as part of his uniform was not in the spirit of the game. Imagine someone today sticking steel plates into their shoulder pads today!
   
         In July of 1919, five entrepreneurs met in a small auto agency in Canton, Ohio, to form the first professional football league. They and their teams were:
       
Frank Neid, owner of the Akron Pros
Ralph Hays, owner of the Canton Bulldogs
Joe Carr, owner of the Columbus Panhandles
Carl Storck, owner of the Dayton Triangles
Leo Lyons, owner of the Rochester Jeffersons

Each franchise cost $25.

Please forgive this moment of self-congratulation. I'm still floored that I found this.  :D

Offline Destraex

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Re: NFL Team Recommendation for an Australian to follow and support.
« Reply #49 on: September 29, 2017, 06:03:20 PM »
Really, steel pads? Was glue on gloves a thing as well?
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Offline MetalDog

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Re: NFL Team Recommendation for an Australian to follow and support.
« Reply #50 on: September 29, 2017, 06:28:51 PM »
Yes.  Back in the 70's, there was a substance called, Stik-um, that receivers used to wear.  Fred Biletnikoff of the Oakland raiders was famous for using it.
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Offline BanzaiCat

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Re: NFL Team Recommendation for an Australian to follow and support.
« Reply #51 on: September 29, 2017, 08:00:05 PM »
Really, steel pads?

Yup. Really.

http://time.com/4202906/football-uniforms-evolution/

Quote
Some of the evolution has been driven by innovation: In the 1920s, one new idea was to have players wear silk pants, on the thought that they were lighter than other options—or, on the other side of the spectrum, to have players wear shoulder pads reinforced with sheet metal, an innovation of the famed Jim Thorpe. In the 1940s, walkie-talkie-type helmets were patented, to let coaches speak directly in players' ears. And, for the last few decades, protecting players from head trauma has been the top priority—not that early football games weren't dangerous too.

(Emphasis mine)
There's some sources that claim it was a rumor, but I had my doubts at the time I wrote it.