Author Topic: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links  (Read 19478 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2015, 06:24:48 PM »
Burma-Siam Railway, "Bridge Over the River Kwai", Thailand - Burma, 1943

Starting in 1942 and through 1943, the Japanese Army built a railway through the jungles, mountains and highlands of Thailand and Burma. 

Approximately 180,000 souls, including 60,000 Allied prisoners were forced to labor on the railway.  Almost 13,000 POWs died while working on railway.  The ordeal of these soldiers received the Hollywood treatment in the 1957 best picture, "The Bridge on the River Kwai."

Here is the real bridge.  It was destroyed during the war by Allied bombers, not William Holden.  It was rebuilt after the war by Japan as part of war reparations.  The round truss spans are from the original bridge. 
https://www.google.com/maps/@14.041386,99.503746,3a,75y,222.71h,88.95t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1s3u1gLgd37P0AAAQZYeW2zg!2e0!3e11

https://www.google.com/maps/@14.041373,99.503997,3a,75y,189.38h,81.23t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1sb8I3ue5irzlZ-sjtDeyTAA!2e0!3e5

This gives you an idea of some of the difficult terrain the railroad was built on. 
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Mae+Klong+Dam+Golf+Course/@14.1047218,99.1668113,3a,75y,90t/data=!3m5!1e2!3m3!1s-qYbKxUFi6bs%2FVNcmgvHONQI%2FAAAAAAAAnXI%2F_UrSMtlqq1U!2e4!3e12!4m2!3m1!1s0x0000000000000000:0xefa253b7b2cc0006

Many of the soldiers who died working on railway, are buried here, at the Chungkai War Cemetery which has almost 1800 Commonweath and Dutch graves.
https://www.google.com/maps/@14.031836,99.525707,3a,75y,181.85h,78.15t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1s0kHl_7Op3-QAAAQfCMEnfw!2e0!3e11

The war cemetery's website is at
http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/2035000/CHUNGKAI%20WAR%20CEMETERY

Here is the war cemetery's description of the railroad from the website.
The notorious Burma-Siam railway, built by Commonwealth, Dutch and American prisoners of war, was a Japanese project driven by the need for improved communications to support the large Japanese army in Burma. During its construction, approximately 13,000 prisoners of war died and were buried along the railway. An estimated 80,000 to 100,000 civilians also died in the course of the project, chiefly forced labour brought from Malaya and the Dutch East Indies or conscripted in Siam (Thailand) and Burma (Myanmar).

Two labour forces, one based in Siam and the other in Burma, worked from opposite ends of the line towards the centre. The Japanese aimed at completing the railway in 14 months and work began in October 1942. The line, 424 kilometres long, was completed by December 1943.

The graves of those who died during the construction and maintenance of the Burma-Siam railway (except for the Americans, whose remains were repatriated) were transferred from camp burial grounds and isolated sites along the railway into three cemeteries at Chungkai and Kanchanaburi in Thailand and Thanbyuzayat in Myanmar.

Chungkai was one of the base camps on the railway and contained a hospital and church built by Allied prisoners of war. The war cemetery is the original burial ground started by the prisoners themselves, and the burials are mostly of men who died at the hospital.

There are now 1,426 Commonwealth and 313 Dutch burials of the Second World War in this cemetery.
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.


Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #31 on: April 14, 2015, 05:11:25 AM »
Sergeant Alvin York’s battle, Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Chatel-Chehery, France, October 8th, 1918

The Meuse-Argonne Offensive, is the largest battle in US history.  1.2 million US troops fought against tenacious German opposition, a month before the end of WWI.  At the height of the fighting, the US was taking 20,000 casualties a week. 

On October 6th, as part of the second phase of the offensive, the US 82nd, “All American” Division replaced the tired 28th Division in the final push towards the Hindenburg Line.  The village of Chatel-Chehery had just been taken, and would become the springboard for the continued advance. 

The Google street view is looking north-northwest along the main street in the village.   In the distance, behind the church steeple you can see the top of hill 223 (strangely Google street view doesn’t get closer).   Hill 223, was the base for an attack by the US 328th Infantry Regiment of the 82nd on October 8th, 1918.  The defending units of the German 2nd Landwehr Division, along with several supporting units, had set up strong machine gun positions, in the hills west and north of this location.   
https://www.google.com/maps/@49.280579,4.953989,3a,75y,335.3h,77.76t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sbpzAmvLYSMFvqEqY1wnYGQ!2e0

The axis of the American attack was heading northwest from hill 223 to a rail line about 2 miles away.  On the left of end of the American assault was a platoon from G Company, of the 328th Infantry.   Shortly after the 0600 H hour, the attack quickly stalled under heavy German machine gun and artillery fire.   To dislodge the Germans, Corporal Alvin York’s platoon, went around the German position's flank.  While they were able to get behind the German machine guns, causalities in the platoon were heavy; York was just a corporal, but found himself in a command of the platoon, now only a small group of eight troops. 

York, an excellent backwoods marksman, moved away from his platoon, and took up a firing position, low on the slope of the hill.  The German machine gunners turned their guns to face the rear threat.  The gunners had to depress their guns, and aim by raising their heads.  York later said: “every time a head done come up, I knocked it down.”  Desperate to rid themselves of the threat, the Germans tried a bayonet charge on York’s position.  With combined rifle and pistol fire, York stopped the charge.  He then went back to taking out gunners.  It was too much for the Germans and they surrendered.  In the end, York, and his depleted platoon, brought in 132 prisoners (including 4 officers).  York would win the Medal of Honor for his actions.

Unlike some military heroes, York remained humble in the face of tremendous publicity.  Not until 20 years after the event did he agree to sell his story to Hollywood, so that he could have funds to donate to the charities he supported.  The Hollywood version of the fight, from the 1940 movie "Sergeant York", with Gary Cooper, is somewhat accurate; the map in the beginning of the video is not a bad depiction of the actual battlefield (even the German officer who speaks English in the movie is accurate….one of the officers York captured worked in New York City before the war). 
Here is a clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmRRhxo0RHc

Over the years (and another world war), the exact location of York’s fight was lost.  About ten years ago, a team of off-duty US military, dedicated themselves to finding the location.  Based on their extensive research and archeological finds, the team rediscovered the locations.  A “circular walk” and monument was put in place to mark the location.

The report of the team is available on-line.  It has quite a bit a military analysis and some great maps.
http://www.battledetective.com/images/York%20Spot/Lt%20Col%20Mastriano's%20report.pdf

Here is a picture of the circular walk, and site:

https://www.google.com/maps/@49.284436,4.95037,3a,75y,90t/data=!3m5!1e2!3m3!1s37105220!2e1!3e10

http://www.sgtyorkdiscovery.com/York_Trail.php

It should be noted, that another team from Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) determined that a site about 1 kilometer away from the monument is what they believe to be the correct site.  Their report is here:

https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/4309
« Last Edit: October 24, 2015, 09:08:05 AM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #32 on: April 24, 2015, 10:58:22 AM »
The Texas War for Independence, October 1835 to April 1836.

In late 1835, US settlers and other local residents (Texanos) of the Mexican province of Texas, revolted and declared independence.  The Texians gathered troops, and the President of Mexico, General Santa Anna,  marched a force of 1,500 Mexican troops into the province to quell the rebellion. 

The result was the 13 day siege of the Alamo in February and March of 1836, where 250 Texians held against Santa Anna’s troops.

The Alamo is a major tourist attraction in San Antonio today.  The iconic church and some of the original buildings still survive.
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.425788,-98.486558,3a,75y,99.24h,78.12t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1shh2cNU0ZEiDFIUjYM8D4tA!2e0!3e5

What has not survived, are the original walls.  You can see the original layout here:
http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/maps/alamo-map-3.gif

This is the approximate location of the south wall.  Evidence of the southwest corner of the Alamo complex have been found in this park.  The church is to the rear. https://www.google.com/maps/@29.425673,-98.486938,3a,75y,253.09h,71.04t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sgxk-kOMMTgci61MUJsUlmA!2e0

This is the approximate location of the north wall, where Santa Anna’s final successful assault broke through.
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.4265289,-98.4867251,3a,75y,107.23h,75.99t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sBKyOaUaQyrd_avvySqq0-A!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

After the Alamo, Santa Ana pursued the Texian army under Sam Houston.  Finally, in April, the Texians turned and struck Santa Ana at the Battle of San Jacinto.  The result was complete surprise, and a Mexican rout.  Today the Battlefield is a state historical site.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/San+Jacinto+Battleground+State+Historic+Site/@29.74929,-95.080933,3a,75y,14.24h,102.77t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1s5kd7ofIQeTsAAAQfCXv__Q!2e0!3e11!4m2!3m1!1s0x8640a0f1682225a7:0x1e89b74ee8a6425b

Here is the official site
http://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/san-jacinto-battleground

This map compares the battlefield today, with a historical map of the San Jacinto battlefield.
http://tpwd.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Compare/storytelling_compare/index.html?appid=3cde3394c71940fd96cdeceb4e2be87d
« Last Edit: June 18, 2016, 01:48:30 PM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #33 on: May 02, 2015, 01:25:29 PM »
Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1 - 3, 1863

The last Southern invasion of the North was stopped at Gettysburg.  The largest battle of the American Civil War, considered by many historians to be the turning point of the war.   

The first day of the battle started here.  Where US cavalry under Buford attempted to hold, or at least slow the advance of Heth's Southern Division coming down the Chambersburg Pike toward Gettysburg.  The statue of Buford is standing next to the road.
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.8378252,-77.2516881,3a,75y,351.12h,73.56t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sQr7m1_KeCJBjvjdAgVOJ0Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

During the first day, the Union was forced to retreat, creating a fishhook shaped line.  The top of the curve of the fishhook was here, at Cemetery Hill.  Looking down towards Gettysburg.
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.820962,-77.229279,3a,75y,11.21h,81.21t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1s0o4aRAR0oSGtV4YJGWOJFA!2e0

The second day of battle shifted to the southern end of the union hook.  The Union defense of Little Round Top, would save the day for the North.  This view is looking from Little Round Top down towards Devil's Den.  The hiking trails here are actually mapped in Google Earth...so feel free to "walk" around a bit.
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.791532,-77.23703,3a,55.3y,290.87h,72.97t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1sRPmjmIBsO5f56AZbcDvnrA!2e0!3e5

Many historians, when picking one place, one fight, where the Battle, and therefore the War were won, pick the defense of Little Round Top and the fight of Col Joshua Chamberlain's 20th Maine Infantry.  By holding firm, against a determined Southern attack, the south anchor of the entire Federal line was saved.   Here is an excerpt from Chamberlain's official report of the fighting.

"The enemy seemed to have gathered all their energies for their final assault. We had gotten our thin line into as good a shape as possible, when a strong force emerged from the scrub wood in the valley, as well as I could judge, in two lines in echelon by the right, and, opening a heavy fire, the first line came on as if they meant to sweep everything before them. We opened on them as well as we could with our scanty ammunition snatched from the field.:

It did not seem possible to withstand another shock like this now coming on. Our loss had been severe. One-half of my left wing had fallen, and a third of my regiment lay just behind us, dead or badly wounded. At this moment my anxiety was increased by a great roar of musketry in my rear, on the farther or northerly slope of Little Round Top, apparently on the flank of the regular brigade, which was in support of Hazlett's battery on the crest behind us. The bullets from this attack struck into my left rear, and I feared that the enemy might have nearly surrounded the Little Round Top, and only a desperate chance was left for us. My ammunition was soon exhausted. My men were firing their last shot and getting ready to club their muskets.:

It was imperative to strike before we were struck by this overwhelming force in a hand-to-hand fight, which we could not probably have withstood or survived. At that crisis, I ordered the bayonet. The word was enough. It ran like fire along the line, from man to man, and rose into a shout, with which they sprang forward upon the enemy, now not 30 yards away. The effect was surprising; many of the enemy's first line threw down their arms and surrendered. An officer fired his pistol at my head with one hand, while he handed me his sword with the other. Holding fast by our right, and swinging forward our left, we made an extended right wheel, before which the enemy's second line broke and fell back, fighting from tree to tree, many being captured, until we had swept the valley and cleared the front of nearly our entire brigade.:

Meantime Captain Morrill with his skirmishers sent out from my left flank, with some dozen or fifteen of the U.S. Sharpshooters who had put themselves under his direction, fell upon the enemy as they were breaking, and by his demonstrations, as well as his well-directed fire, added much to the effect of the charge.:

Having thus cleared the valley and driven the enemy up the western slope of the Great Round Top, not wishing to press so far out as to hazard the ground I was to hold by leaving it exposed to a sudden rush of the enemy, I succeeded (although with some effort to stop my men, who declared they were "on the road to Richmond") in getting the regiment into good order and resuming our original position.:

Four hundred prisoners, including two field and several line officers, were sent to the rear. These were mainly from the Fifteenth and Forty-seventh Alabama Regiments, with some of the Fourth and Fifth Texas. One hundred and fifty of the enemy were found killed and wounded in our front
.:"

Just below Little Round Top, there a small boulder strewn hill, named "Devil's Den", that was a natural defensive position.  First defended by union artillery and infantry, it was taken by McLaw's Southern division during the 2nd day of the Battle.  After that, it served as natural cover for Southern sharp-shooters.  A closer view of Devil's Den.  The hill in the background is Little Round Top.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gettysburg+National+Military+Park/@39.792941,-77.242106,3a,75y,239.32h,87.45t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1s1d8P8UH2OpUAAAQDMaODdQ!2e0!3e11!4m2!3m1!1s0x89c9ace65f3a5d61:0xbd318f2711ad0a67

Here is an eyewitness account, sharpshooters at Devil's Den.   The account of Captain Augustus P. Martin, commander of the Union V Corps artillery at Gettysburg (From "Gettysburg Compiler", October24, 1899)

"Among the interesting incidents that occurred on Little Round Top was the summary way in which a sharpshooter was disposed of in rear of Devil's Den. He had concealed himself behind a stone wall between two boulders and for a long time we were annoyed by shots from that direction, one of which actually combed my hair over my left ear and passed through the shoulder of a man a little taller than myself who was standing behind me for a cover. At last we were able to locate the spot, by the use of a field glass, from whence the shots came by little puffs of smoke that preceded the whizzing of the bullets that passed by our heads. We then loaded one of our guns with a percussion shell, taking careful and accurate aim. When the shot was fired the shell struck and exploded on the face of one of the boulders. We supposed the shot had frightened him away, as we were no longer troubled with shots from that location. When the battle was ended we rode over to the Devil's Den and found behind the wall a dead Confederate soldier lying upon his back and, so far as we could see, did not have a mark upon his body, and from that fact became convinced that he was killed by the concussion of the shell when it exploded on the face of the boulder."



On the 3rd day, Confederate General Lee decided to push through the Union center.  12,000 Southern troops marched, then charged in open ground, against a solid Northern line.  The Southern General Pickett, for whom the charge is named, effectively lost his entire division, while the Northern line held.  Years later, Pickett is reported to have said about Lee:  "that old man had my division slaughtered."  This view is from the Northern lines, looking out over the fields where the Southern charge came from.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Gettysburg+National+Military+Park/@39.813076,-77.236259,3a,75y,163.8h,88.64t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1s4EdnbRRDe2wAAAQIt2I3Rw!2e0!3e11!4m2!3m1!1s0x89c9ace65f3a5d61:0xbd318f2711ad0a67
« Last Edit: March 12, 2017, 06:56:26 PM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #34 on: May 15, 2015, 01:37:19 PM »
Battle of Sekigehara, Gifu Prefecture, Japan, October 21, 1600

For 250 years, the “Warring States” period was one of the most tumultuous eras in Japanese history.  Numerous warlords rose and fell, as they fought each other to rule Japan and establish themselves as Shogun (Military Dictator).  This period came to an end here, at Sekigehara.   

The Eastern Army under Tokugawa Ieyasu had approximately 75,000 men, against the Western Army’s 120,000 men under Ishida Mitsunari.  The Western Army had an advantage of position, as they held the high ground. 

Tokugawa’s camp site was here
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.365459,136.465196,3a,33.1y,350.64h,88.06t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sb-ahIfb7AW6oW0pve2z6GQ!2e0

and Ishida’s camp was here
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.370919,136.459856,3a,75y,341.27h,90.44t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sMax3GWLyMRAEoGVpwGbVLA!2e0

The battle started Tokugawa’s advance guard of 6000 men crossed the Fuji river here.  The camera is looking toward the Western Army’s center right positions.  The fighting quickly bogged down on muddy ground.   
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.365369,136.458588,3a,75y,271.88h,86t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sC3ykM-d9iRIx-WvfER2ikg!2e0

To support the action on his left, Tokugawa then ordered attacks against the center.  This then became the main focal point of the battle.   This view is looking toward the Western Army's positions in the hills.
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.370408,136.46164,3a,75y,357.79h,82.31t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sl7Ky-VwUmItr00QEsSaWvg!2e0!6m1!1e1

Tokugawa had an ace up his sleeve.  One of Ishida’s generals, Kobayakawa, on the Western Army's right flank, on Mt. Matsuo, was ready to defect.  But Kobayakawa was taking his time, so Ieyasu directed arquebus fire towards Kobayakawa, and he finally defected.  This turned the tide and Ishida’s forces could not recover from the treachery.  Here is Kobayakawa’s postion, on Mt. Matsuo
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.352618,136.461674,3a,75y,210.74h,95.18t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1s7UGPyUxzW5Em_2Y0LZLnUg!2e0

Because of his victory at Sekigehara, Tokugawa Ieyasu was able to consolidate power, and establish a Shogunate, that lasted until 1868. 
Normally, it would have been difficult to find all of these locations.  However, some kind netizen had done most of the hard work already.  You can see this great map of key locations.  I will certainly be taking this, if I ever visit the battle site.
https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=zo4r7DTRM90g.k7VedlcnZij0

Some more detailed information and a good English map is at:
http://www.nakasendoway.com/the-story-of-the-battle-of-sekigahara/

« Last Edit: October 17, 2015, 07:49:00 AM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #35 on: May 15, 2015, 01:47:26 PM »
« Last Edit: June 05, 2015, 09:31:09 PM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #36 on: June 03, 2015, 06:23:01 PM »
Battle of Waterloo, Mont St. Jean, Belgium, June 18, 1815

The last major battle of Napoleon's career, was a "near run thing" according to the Duke of Wellington.
72,000 French met 68,000 British and Allied troops on the road to Brussels, on ground of the Duke of Wellington's choosing.
The later part of the battle focused on the farm of La Haye Sainte.  The French, in a very late afternoon attack, focused on La Haye Sainte, and the open ground to the west of the farm.  Marshall Ney, led the French cavalry and Napoleon even committed the Imperial Guard to the attack.  Here is a view of La Haye Sainte
https://www.google.com/maps/@50.677988,4.412355,3a,75y,234.88h,81.04t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1soQ9NhFEEY-0kobTBixho5A!2e0

This view is looking toward the area where the final defense against the Guard occurred.   After the war, the battlefield almost immediately became a tourist attraction, and a large observation hill was built at the point where the battle finally culminated.    Pan to the right and you can see La Haye Sainte.
https://www.google.com/maps/@50.67031,4.408973,3a,75y,16.14h,88.19t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sempyftCZ_1nP6BV9eP7cZw!2e0

This is the view from atop the observation hill.  Looking towards where the French cavalry and Guard were coming from.  The British defense was so intense, the Middle Guard broke and the cry was heard, "La garde recule ! Sauve qui peut!" (The Guard retreats ! Save yourself if you can !)
https://www.google.com/maps/@50.678495,4.404918,3a,78.2y,133.27h,80.5t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1s-P0It7a_-AQAAAQZEmO2Ng!2e0!3e11

Here is a pretty good site describing the Guard’s final actions at Waterloo.
http://www.napolun.com/mirror/napoleonistyka.atspace.com/Imperial_Guard_at_Waterloo.htm

"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #37 on: September 04, 2015, 05:56:37 PM »
Battle of Mons, Belgium, August 23, 1914

As part of the Schlieffen Plan, the German 1st Army acted as the “right hook” as it swung through Belgium in mid / late August, 1914.  The British Expeditionary Force (BEF), newly arrived, moved to Mons on August 22nd, to take up its planned positions on the far left of the Allied line.  This put the two corps of the BEF, directly into the path of Alexander von Kluck’s German First Army, with it’s seven corps.
On August 23rd, the first major British, German engagement was fought here.  The Google location is where the 4th Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, defended the canal crossing.  The Germans began their attack across the canal at 9am.
 
https://www.google.com/maps/@50.4753238,3.9454069,3a,75y,309.28h,67.67t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sfoJdGCYjHs3gVUXDd839PA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

The original BEF was still a highly professional pre-war force.  The British fire discipline was so intense, that the Germans thought that some of the infantry fire was machine gun fire.  Initial German casualties were very heavy.  Eventually, around 3PM, the British badly outnumbered, could no longer hold.  Lt  Maurice Dease of the 4th Bn, kept his machine gun section firing to cover the British retreat.  Lt Dease, and one of his gunners, Pvt. Sidney Godley each received the Victoria Cross for staying behind to hold back the German advance.   

You can see the plaque to the two British VC winners behind this view.

An interesting centennial site:
http://ww1.canada.com/after-the-war/memorial-events-mark-the-battle-of-mons-centenary

and Dan Snow explains the entire battle in less than 3 min...and does a good job.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGtfUwW3ZFI

The BBC "Battlefield Walks" episode.  Well worth 30min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lahW_etCwuw&t=81s
« Last Edit: March 12, 2017, 07:04:10 PM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #38 on: September 30, 2015, 04:57:49 AM »
Battle of Talavera, Talavera de le Reina, Toledo, Spain, October 27 and 28, 1809

In the summer of 1809, 20,000 British and Portuguese troops, under Sir Arthur Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington, used their recent success in Portugal to march into the teeth of French controlled Spain. The British joined forces with a 33,000 strong Spanish Army under General Cuesta and marched toward Madrid.  Marshall Victor, with 46,000 French troops, attacked the British / Spanish forces at Talavera. Sir Arthur, probably the best defensive general of his era, chose his ground well, and repulsed numerous French attacks.
 
As Victor’s forces arrived on the evening of October 27th, he immediately attacked the Cerro de Medellin, a hill on the left of the British / Spanish line, that was Wellesley’s key defensive position.  The ensuing rare Napoleonic night fight, saw the French division under Ruffin, briefly hold the Medellin, only to be pushed back by British counter-attack. 

Here is the Google view, looking up the Medellin as the French would have seen it.  Note the dam and reservoir behind.  Those were put in place in the 1940s, so the battlefield has changed significantly in 205 years.
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9954884,-4.8415914,3a,75y,242.76h,89.52t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s_guWnWEprBT0PJmPCb119A!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1

At first light, Ruffin's division launched a new, more massive attack on the Medellin.  Charles Oman describes the attack in his goto work “A History of the Peninsular War Vol II”, published 1903.  The book is available for free download at Google books.

When the light companies had fallen back, the French were at last visible through the smoke. They had mounted the lower slopes of the Cerro without any loss, covered by their artillery, which only ceased firing at this moment. They showed nine battalions, in three solid columns : Victor had arranged the divisions with the 24th in the centre, the 96th on the left, and the 9th Leger, which had suffered so severely in the nightbattle, upon the right. This arrangement brought the last named regiment opposite their old enemies of the 29th, and the Battalion of Detachments, while the l/48th and 2/48th had to deal with the French centre, and the Buffs and 66th with their left. When Ruffin's columns had got within a hundred yards of the sky-line, Hill bade his six battalions stand to their feet and advance. As they lined the crest they delivered a splendid volley, whose report was as sharp and precise as that of a field-day. The effect was of course murderous, as was always the case when line met column. The French had a marked superiority in numbers ; they were nearly 5,000 strong, Hill's two brigades had less than 4,000 2. But there was the usual advantage that every British soldier could use his weapon, while the French, in column of divisions, had the normal mass of useless muskets in the rear ranks. The first volley brought them to a standstill—their whole front had gone down at the discharge—they lost the impetus of advance, halted, and kept up a furious fire for some minutes. But when it came to a standing fight of musketry, there was never a doubt in any Peninsular battle how the game would end. The French fire began ere long to slacken, the front of the columns shook and wavered.

Just at this moment Sherbrooke, who had noted that the divisions in his own front showed no signs of closing, took the 5th battalion of the King's German Legion out of his left brigade 1, and sent it against the flank and rear of Ruffin's nearest regiment—the 96th of the line. When the noise of battle broke out in this new quarter, the French lost heart and began to give ground. Richard Stewart, at the northern end of the British line, gave the signal to his brigade to charge, and —as a participator in this fray writes, ' on we went, a wall of stout hearts and bristling steel. The enemy did not fancy such close quarters, and the moment our rush began they went to the right-about. The principal portion broke and fled, though some brave fellows occasionally faced about and gave us an irregular fire.' Nothing, however, could stop Hill's division, and the whole six battalions rushed like a torrent down the slope, bayonetting and sweeping back the enemy to the line of black and muddy pools that marked the course of the Portifia. Many of the pursuers even crossed the ravine and chased the flying French divisions right into the arms of Villatte's troops, on the Cascajal Hill. When these reserves opened fire, Hill's men re-formed on the lower slope of the Cerro, and retired to their old position without being seriously molested, for Victor made no counter-attack.

Ruffin's three regiments had been terribly punished : they had lost, in forty minutes' fighting, 1,300 killed and wounded, much more than a fourth of their strength. Hill's brigades had about 750 casualties2, including their gallant leader, who received a wound in the head, and had to go to the rear, leaving the command of his division to Tilson. The loss of the German battalion which had struck in upon the French rear was insignificant, as the enemy never stood to meet it


This is the view of the Medellin that Ruffin would have had just before his division attacked on the morning of October 28th:
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0011637,-4.8320469,3a,22.9y,228.9h,91.45t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sL8foqtxGgghrp6F5yLzb0Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1

After Ruffin's morning attack, the other French divisions attacked at various points on the British line, all during the day; including the attacks on the Medellin, there were a total of seven attacks.  Only one of the attacks forced a localized British retreat, creating a gap, that Wellesley managed to plug before the French could push through the line.

This view is approximately where one of those attacks started; Levalle’s French division.
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9814489,-4.8260916,3a,75y,295.11h,81.2t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1seLuFwANWYQqUrj-4_gaSjQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1

At the end of the 28th, their attacks having failed to dislodge the British, the French troops were spent.  Victor had had enough.  When the British awoke on the morning of the 29th, they found the French had gone.  While Sir Arthur had won the battle, decidedly beating Victor, he soon found out that another French force of 50,000 troops under Marshall Soult was on an intercept path.  Low on supplies, and bickering with his Spanish allies, the future Duke was forced to retreat back into Portugal.

The original battlefield memorial is on the Medellin.  But the hill is private property, so another was erected at the approximate center rear of the British line. 
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9851285,-4.8471801,3a,75y,297.94h,101.87t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZWsR4oubyd9zmIRzOsKBbQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1

Some kind netizen has posted a battlemap super imposed on the modern roads. Great for battlefield visitors. 
http://www.peninsularwar.org/map_tv.htm

« Last Edit: December 04, 2016, 02:05:53 PM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #39 on: October 18, 2015, 06:14:49 PM »
Battle of Leipzig, 16-19 October, 1813,

Part 1, Cavalry Clash at Liebertwolkwitz, Germany, 14 October, 1813

Many historians have argued that the most important battle of the Napoleonic Wars was not Waterloo, but Leipzig.  It was the largest Napoleonic battle, with 225,000 French and French allied troops, against 380,000 Coalition Allied troops, made up of Russians, Austrians, Prussians and Swedes.  Truly the “Battle of Nations”, Leipzig was a sound defeat for Napoleon, ending his 1813 campaign in Germany, and sending the French reeling back to France, where Allied victories would force Napoleon to abdicate.

The battle of Leipzig was a sprawling affair, fought over three days.  One of the initial actions, fought on October 14th, two days before the main battle, was a cavalry clash south of the village of Liebertwolkwitz.  Intent on attacking Napoleon’s forces at Leipzig, the Allies resolved to send a “grand reconnaissance” forward.  This reconnaissance was conducted by the vanguard of the Army of Bohemia, led by Russian General Count Wittgenstein, who attacked the village of Liebertwolkwitz from south and southeast.  The village was held by a French mixed cavalry and infantry force under Marshal Murat. 

While French and Allied infantry fought a seesaw battle for control of the village itself, the Allied left, mostly made of cavalry, halted as it observed a large French cavalry and artillery force west of Liebertwolkwitz.  The Allied force regrouped, then attacked.  The result was a massive cavalry battle in this field (the Allied position would have been to the left, and the French to the right in this view):

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Liebertwolkwitz,+Leipzig,+Germany/@51.2729981,12.4490443,3a,75y,265.77h,80.46t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sfR4SoBb365gGr_zEOnyxUA!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo3.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DfR4SoBb365gGr_zEOnyxUA%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D142.7272%26pitch%3D0!7i13312!8i6656!4m2!3m1!1s0x47a6feaf27e69435:0x521b1cb428d6d00!6m1!1e1

The French defensive line was backed by 30 artillery pieces located approximately here, looking toward the Allied positions.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Liebertwolkwitz,+Leipzig,+Germany/@51.2831593,12.4414761,3a,75y,190.36h,83.84t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sb9U55c_uU37uWivjgH036w!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo3.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3Db9U55c_uU37uWivjgH036w%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D311.98743%26pitch%3D0!7i13312!8i6656!4m2!3m1!1s0x47a6feaf27e69435:0x521b1cb428d6d00!6m1!1e1

The combat is described in Napoleon at Leipzig, the Battle of the Nations, 1813, by George Nafziger, pages 91 -93

Roder sent the landwehr cavalry, under von Mutius, to support the Cossacks north of Crobern, and placed himself with the Slilesian Cuirassier Regiment and Horse Battery #2. He ordered them to advance at a trot, and ordered the Brandenburg Cuirassiers to follow behind quickly. As he reached the Leipzig Road, he saw on the plateau a mass of French cavalry to the north.  The Silesian Cuirassier Regiment were ordered forward to attack them.
The Brandenburg and Silesian Cuirassiers deployed to the left in platoon column and trotted forward on Pahlen’s left.  The Silesian Cuirassiers deployed to the left and the Brandenburg Cuirassiers deployed to the right, both in echelons. They advanced forward on either side of the East Prussian Cuirassier Regiment. The three regiments drove forward and struck the head of Milhaud's column of dragoons, the 22nd and 25th Dragoons, who had formed in line. Behind the 22nd and 25th Dragoons came a column formed of the 20th, 19th and 18th Dragoon Regiments.
The battle continued, in an uninterrupted series of charges and countercharges. Murat ignored his position as commander by once again reducing himself to the position of brigade or regimental commander and leading one charge after another. He lost overall control of the battle.
Towards noon, the exhaustion of both sides was so great, that, for a short while, the two belligerent forces on the plateau by Giilden-Gossa stood 300 to 400 paces from one another, resting their panting horses and recovering their wounded.  The further course of the battle consisted solely of the constant and uncoordinated  pushes of small groups  of  cavalry without plan.
In one instance, Murat had personally led forward a regiment. It broke in the attack and was falling back, when Lieutenant Guido von der Lippe, of the Neumark Dragoon Regiment, spotted Murat alone and undefended. He promptly led forward a small force of men, in an effort to seize Murat, but was shot dead by the single trooper standing by Murat.
Pahlen (Allied), seeing the turn taken by the battle, resolved to hold his position, until the arrival of Klenau's column. He refused his left wing and supported it with two Prussian batteries. He pushed forward his right wing. The French, on their side, reinforced their right and established, between Wachau and Liebertwolkwitz, a number of strong batteries, whose fire took the allied left in enfilade.
Murat, believing the moment had come to finish the allied force, formed a single large column, with the cavalry of the V Cavalry Corps, and threw them against the allied batteries. The allied artillery responded with cannister, that inflicted many casualties on the head of the French column.  The Russian Hussars, the Prussian Uhlans and the Brandenburg Cuirassiers took advantage of this, to throw themselves on the French. It was now 2:00 P.M., and the battle had begun at 9:00 A.M.

By the end of the day, neither side had made significant gains, and both sides had lost approximately 1500 men each. But this was just a taste of the much larger battle to come. 

For the wargamers out there, Liebertwolkwitz has two scenarios in GMT's recently released Command and Colors Napoleonics, Expansion 5.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2015, 04:31:47 PM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #40 on: November 28, 2015, 07:34:52 AM »
Battle of Lundy's Lane, near Niagara Falls, Canada, July 25, 1814

In the summer of 1814, the American army under Major General Jacob Brown, moved into Canada, up to Niagara river. They had some initial success, defeating a British force at the Battle of Chippawa.

But the American's did not have enough heavy guns to take the British stronghold at Ft. George, so they took up positions near the fort, waiting for naval reinforcements that would never come.

After being continuously harassed by British allied native raids, the American's started to withdrawal in late July. The British, under Lieutenant General Gordon Drummond, maintained contact, and took up defensive positions near Niagara Falls, on a low ridge at Lundy's Lane.

The key to the British position, were the British line of artillery pieces on the ridge.  The Americans, decided to attack, to force the British back to Fort George.

The American forces, made up of many US Army regulars, came to around 2,500 men, and British forces around 3,500. The battle would be a night fight, with the Americans attacking around 6PM. After taking the brunt of point-blank cannon fire, the American's were able to take the line of British guns. The combat was mostly hand to hand, and so bloody that British troops who had seen combat in Spain, said they had seen nothing like it. The British counter-attacked three times, the last time around midnight, but they could not retake the guns. 

After the last British attack, the Americans, were depleted and outnumbered, so they retreated from the field, leaving the guns. The British, with one general officer captured, and Drummond wounded, were too spent to pursue. Both sides lost almost 900 men each, for the Americans, this was a devastating number.

Overall, the battle was a strategic victory for the British, as the American's had lost so many troops that they were forced to withdraw to Fort Erie.

This is a view of the battlefield today. In 1814 this was open land, but now is urban sprawl. The churchyard to the left was there, and this road is the approximate position of the British guns. The American attack would have been coming from the left.
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0895737,-79.0956424,3a,75y,242.05h,85.98t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s93HfAOcPGhCLpuXCcu3lBQ!2e0!7i13312!8i6656

This is a pretty good site that gives some great background, and a great map of the battle.
http://www.uppercanadahistory.ca/1812/18129.html


« Last Edit: March 12, 2017, 07:11:31 PM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #41 on: December 14, 2015, 03:44:43 PM »
Lexington and Concord, near Boston, Massachusetts, April 19, 1775

“the shot heard ‘round the world”

The American Revolution started with a series of skirmishes between British Regulars and Colonial Militia at Lexington and Concord.  And while the military effect of these fights were relatively minor, the political effect was to ignite the Revolution.   

In the early morning hours of April 19, 1775, a force of 700 British regulars, under Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith, left Boston, on a secret mission to destroy rebel supplies at Concord, a small town west of Boston. While rebels were clearly planning for trouble, as of April 19th, there were still no shots being fired. 

The Americans were forewarned of the British expedition.  At dawn, the British advanced guard entered Lexington, a small town on the main route to Concord. As the British troops approached the town center, a group of about 80 militia emerged from Buckman’s tavern on Lexington Green. The militia formed a line and blocked the British advance. A British officer approached the militia and apparently ordered them to disperse. The atmosphere was charged with tension, but neither side was looking for a fight. Then someone fired a shot. The Regulars thinking they were being fired upon, started volley fire, and followed-up with a bayonet charge.  The colonists broke and ran, but eight of them were killed.
 
"[A]t 5 o’clock we arrived [in Lexington], and saw a number of people, I believe between 200 and 300, formed in a common in the middle of town; we still continued advancing, keeping prepared against an attack through without intending to attack them; but on our coming near them they fired on us two shots, upon which our men without any orders, rushed upon them, fired and put them to flight; several of them were killed, we could not tell how many, because they were behind walls and into the woods. We had a man of the 10th light Infantry wounded, nobody else was hurt. We then formed on the Common, but with some difficulty, the men were so wild they could hear no orders; we waited a considerable time there, and at length proceeded our way to Concord." — Lieutenant John Barker, 4th Regiment of Foot

Here is Lexington Green.  Buckman tavern can be seen behind this view.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Lexington+Minute+Men+Memorial,+Bedford+St,+Lexington,+MA+02420/@42.4495359,-71.2302337,3a,90y,267.43h,76.43t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sri0rTXaHy_OxK8-jcjz07g!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo1.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3Dri0rTXaHy_OxK8-jcjz07g%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D78.873573%26pitch%3D0!7i13312!8i6656!4m2!3m1!1s0x89e39dd044394067:0x633747e130438b8c

The British then marched on to Concord. The skirmish on Lexington Green stirred the hornets nest, and more colonial militia began to gather to oppose the Regulars.  When the British came into Concord, they split. The main body stayed in Concord, while a scouting party went out to a nearby farm to look for contraband weapons.  About 100 Regulars secured North Bridge as a retreat route for the scouting party. Overlooking North Bridge, on the top of a low hill, the colonial militia gathered. Neither side was firing on the other at this point. 

When the militia clearly outnumbered the small British force at North Bridge, the militia began to advance.  The British, began to retreat back across the bridge, towards town.  At some point, a panicked British soldier fired a shot.  Then volleys were exchanged, and the disrupted British began to flee back toward Concord. 

This is a view of North Bridge, looking from the American militia positions at the top of the hill.  The minuteman memorial can also be seen. The tall white memorial on the other side of bridge is approximately were three British soldiers fell from the American volleys.  Two of these British soldiers are still buried at the foot of the bridge.  The following inscription is on their grave: They came three thousand miles and died,To keep the past upon its throne.Unheard beyond the ocean tide,Their English mother made her moan.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Lexington+Minute+Men+Memorial,+Bedford+St,+Lexington,+MA+02420/@42.469479,-71.3529713,3a,15y,107.24h,88.54t/data=!3m8!1e1!3m6!1s-WnWuRPsUiY8%2FVlkQ7__l3vI%2FAAAAAAAAL5E%2FSzJljZ-eybk!2e4!3e11!6s%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com%2F-WnWuRPsUiY8%2FVlkQ7__l3vI%2FAAAAAAAAL5E%2FSzJljZ-eybk%2Fw203-h101-n-k-no%2F!7i8704!8i4352!4m2!3m1!1s0x89e39dd044394067:0x633747e130438b8c

The British would have a long tortuous march back to Boston, enduring harassing fire from militia all along the route.  Eventually, Smith’s troops were saved by a relief force, and made it back to Boston.  By the next day however, 15,000 colonial militia had gathered, and Boston was besieged.  The Revolution had begun. 
This is a link to a great animated map, that is pretty detailed and shows the situation very well.

http://www.revolutionarywaranimated.com/LexingtonAnimation.html

« Last Edit: December 16, 2015, 08:53:08 PM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline BanzaiCat

  • Arquebusier
  • ***
  • Posts: 19334
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #42 on: December 14, 2015, 08:13:47 PM »
Thanks, AT, for continuing to do this.

This site (http://www.revolutionarywaranimated.com) is indeed pretty awesome! I watched several of the animations and bookmarked for later to finish it up.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #43 on: December 15, 2015, 08:42:43 PM »
Thanks, AT, for continuing to do this.

This site (http://www.revolutionarywaranimated.com) is indeed pretty awesome! I watched several of the animations and bookmarked for later to finish it up.

Thanks, please post your own Google battlesites.

Regarding Lexington/Concord, I see that Compass Games has just put Revolution Road on the pre-order list.  Lexington/Concord and Bunker Hill.  So I am jazzed about that.

http://compassgames.com/index.php/preorders/revolution-road.html
« Last Edit: December 16, 2015, 07:46:36 AM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.

Offline ArizonaTank

  • Man-at-Arms
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
Re: Battlefield Tours - Virtually: Google Street View Links
« Reply #44 on: April 10, 2016, 12:07:22 PM »
Pearl Harbor, Oahu, December 7, 1941


The Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, was a severe blow to the US Pacific Fleet, and was the jolt that brought a reluctant US into WWII.  The Japanese attacked in two waves, using over 350 aircraft from six aircraft carriers.  All eight US battleships were hit, with four of them being sunk (two were later refloated).  Over 180 US aircraft were destroyed, mostly on the ground. 

The view below is looking out over the harbor to Ford Island.  The long white building in the distance is the Arizona memorial, and marks the end of "battleship" row, where the Japanese pilots found easy targets. 

https://www.google.com/maps/@21.3669938,-157.9398514,3a,66.7y,277.27h,84.07t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s31v36Mb9G5pRL1bJZIev_Q!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1

The view from inside the Arizona memorial.  The US Arizona, BB-39 was a Pennsylvania class battleship, that had been the height of technology in WWI, but by 1941 would  have had trouble standing toe-to-toe with more modern battlewagons.  The Arizona was hit four times by Japanese dive bombers.  The last bomb, penetrated the deck, and reached the forward magazine.  The resulting explosion doomed Arizona, and killed over 1,000 sailors.  During WWII, the superstructure and main turrets were salvaged. The barbette of one of the turrets is still visible above water.   

https://www.google.com/maps/place/USS+Utah/@21.3649705,-157.9499973,3a,75y,77.17h,65.08t/data=!3m8!1e1!3m6!1s-nvGH01L3kxE%2FVDs2Qv4IH6I%2FAAAAAAAABOA%2FnSlUp4AYsRU!2e4!3e11!6s%2F%2Flh6.googleusercontent.com%2F-nvGH01L3kxE%2FVDs2Qv4IH6I%2FAAAAAAAABOA%2FnSlUp4AYsRU%2Fw203-h101-n-k-no%2F!7i6656!8i3328!4m2!3m1!1s0x0000000000000000:0xb4bdfae6059c127c!6m1!1e1

Two battleships were completely destroyed in the attack.  Besides the Arizona, the other was the USS Utah. BB-31 (technically Utah was ex-BB-31, and was designated AG-16 at the time of the attack).  The Utah was an older, pre-WWI dreadnought, its main guns removed, it was used as a target ship (US bombers would drop water bombs on its decks), and for AA gun training.  During the attack, Utah was struck with two torpedoes, it rolled over, and trapped 64 men who were never recovered.  Attempts to refloat the ship failed.  The wreck can still be seen from the memorial pier on Ford Island. 
https://www.google.com/maps/place/USS+Utah/@21.3688716,-157.9621375,3a,75y,281.14h,83.39t/data=!3m8!1e1!3m6!1s-gvkrznVnW8U%2FV3LHnPhf8lI%2FAAAAAAAAHcs%2FprFinTR89EMsTDsS2lajtabth1P7HHwWwCLIB!2e4!3e11!6s%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com%2F-gvkrznVnW8U%2FV3LHnPhf8lI%2FAAAAAAAAHcs%2FprFinTR89EMsTDsS2lajtabth1P7HHwWwCLIB%2Fw203-h100-k-no-pi-0-ya189.83983-ro-0-fo100%2F!7i10240!8i5120!4m5!3m4!1s0x0000000000000000:0xb4bdfae6059c127c!8m2!3d21.3683597!4d-157.9615341

Here is a great site that gives more details on the USS Utah: 
http://www.oocities.org/historypost/Utah/utahpage.htm

In addition to the ships at Pearl Harbor, the Japanese attack also concentrated on the US airbases on Oahu.  Hickam airfield was strafed and bombed.  Today, bullet and shrapnel damage is kept on the headquarters building as a reminder.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bullet_holes_at_headquarters_building_of_Hickam_Air_Force_Base.jpg
« Last Edit: March 12, 2017, 07:16:00 PM by ArizonaTank »
"Baseball's Sad Lexicon" - 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
      Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
      Making a Giant hit into a double—
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
      “Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

"Tinker to Evers to Chance"
"where doubles go to die"

These three players helped the Cubs win four National League championships and two World Series from 1906 to 1910.