Author Topic: Matrix World in Flames  (Read 28836 times)

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Offline smittyohio

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Re: Matrix World in Flames
« Reply #180 on: April 11, 2019, 05:20:36 AM »
sure i have bought things since from matrix, but i would have bought more and thought less about it if they would have handled better.

Since this debacle, I don't think I've bought a single full-priced game from them, partly out of spite... everything has been either from their holiday sale, or random Fanatical / Humble bundle stuff.


Offline Pete Dero

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Re: Matrix World in Flames
« Reply #181 on: April 11, 2019, 09:10:20 AM »
Are asynch PBEM games possible? or just "real-time"?

After Action Report for NetPlay Ready

part 1 http://www.matrixgames.com/forums/tm.asp?m=4616601&mpage=1&key=%26%2365533%3B
part 2 http://www.matrixgames.com/forums/tm.asp?m=4617004
part 3 http://www.matrixgames.com/forums/tm.asp?m=4617528

For communicating with each other during game play, we used Skype. It is a free download and worked very well for us. NetPlay as implemented in Matrix Games World in Flames (MWIF) handles all the communications between the two computers, each of which runs its own copy of the program and maintains it own internal copy of the “game state”.

When one player moves a unit, NetPlay sends a message to a Matrix Games NetPlay server, which forwards it to the other player’s computer. The other player’s computer then updates its copy of the game state. This keeps the computers in synch as to what is happening in the game. Because MWIF uses the NetPlay server, neither players’ computer needs to act as a ‘master’ or ‘slave’.

There are some phases of the game where the players make decisions simultaneously. For example, that happens during the Production phases and when deciding whether air units fly as fighters or bombers. The way NetPlay handles those phases is that it collects all the decisions, and once both players have finished the phase or subphase, NetPlay sends the decisions en masse to the other computer. Play then resumes as usual.