GrogHeads Forum

Tabletop Gaming, Models, and Minis => Modelling and Miniatures => Topic started by: Bison on May 20, 2018, 04:54:41 PM

Title: Airbrush Painting
Post by: Bison on May 20, 2018, 04:54:41 PM
Iím pretty sure JD uses an airbrush, anyone else?

Iím finalizing some research but will be ordering my kit this week.  Brush, compressor, and paint station.  A few odds and ends because stuff needs stuff.

Right now mostly plan to use for priming and clear coating but hope to graduate to base coating and some shadowing eventually. 
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: GDS_Starfury on May 20, 2018, 08:52:17 PM
Paasche or Badger is the way to go.
practice camo patterns when you prime.
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: JudgeDredd on May 20, 2018, 11:23:27 PM
I'd add Iwata or Harder and Steenbeck. I love my Iwata TRN 1
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: Bison on May 21, 2018, 04:53:35 AM
Iíve got my brush decision down to a couple of choices but am just looking at a couple of diffenet sites and local businesses comparing prices.  The first step is to clear a corner and setup a work area in the basement so hang a couple of work lights, put up a folding table and shelf unit to store my paints, brushes, and other odds and ends. 



Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: JudgeDredd on May 21, 2018, 04:55:34 AM
Iíve got my brush decision down to a couple of choices but am just looking at a couple of diffenet sites and local businesses comparing prices.  The first step is to clear a corner and setup a work area in the basement so hang a couple of work lights, put up a folding table and shelf unit to store my paints, brushes, and other odds and ends.
Sounds like a plan
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: Bison on May 21, 2018, 03:47:01 PM
Yeah.  The real issue is I'll be down in the basement where I'll have to address a serious lack of lighting.  Getting lights isn't the issue but getting lights that will not distort the paint colors may be an issue.  Ultimately the kit has to be able to be packed into a tough tote or two for safe transportation.

Looking at a Paasche D3000R air compressor and a Paasche Talon or Raptor airbrush or a Badger TC910 air compressor and either a Patriot or Krome airbrush.  The former has a readily available kit for a decent price but I think Badger has better customer service and response should issues arise.  Anyway, both kits are sufficient for my needs and I can always upgrade the airbrush later if I want to do so.
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: Tuna on May 29, 2018, 02:14:40 PM
I loved my Paasche when I was modelling, even ordered a double action one (but had stopped before I got to use it).

Badger had great starting brushes...

Only brush I truly hated, was some testors plastic piece of crap.. hope the don't make that anymore!
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: Staggerwing on May 29, 2018, 07:13:10 PM
I loved my Paasche when I was modelling, even ordered a double action one (but had stopped before I got to use it).

Badger had great starting brushes...

Only brush I truly hated, was some testors plastic piece of crap.. hope the don't make that anymore!

The one with the blue body&handle? And cans of compressed air?
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: Con on June 13, 2018, 09:07:51 PM
Thinking about getting an airbrush as well.  General question how hard/arduous is it to clean? 
Do you use multiple airbrushes or do you use one and clean between colors
What is the best compressor that is quiet
Do you need a fume hood setup or can you do this in the corner of a basement

Thanks
Con
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: JudgeDredd on June 13, 2018, 11:11:14 PM
Not hard at all.

I have one airbrush with a conversion kit from 0.35mm needle to 0.5mm needle but that's so I can blow primer through it. However a 0.35mm needle is really all you need if a) you don't use primer (it's over rated imo) and b) if I do use primer now, I used Tamiya spray cans. they're easy peasy and give a great finish.

Cleaning is very easy. When in a "sitting" I'll empty the cup, use a few drops of cleaner and an old brush and give the cup a good clean. Tip that away and blow out what's left. A few more drops of cleaner and the the brush again. Tip that out, wipe the cup dry and blow out what's there. If what's coming out is clean, then I'm good to go for another paint. If not, rinse repeat. It sounds more arduous than it is. Literally a couple of minutes between changing paints and not a whole lot of cleaner used.

After a painting session, I'll strip the brush down and give it a good clean before storing away. Again, this sounds harder and more extreme than it really it. Once it's cleaned, I'll put some lube on the needle, a couple of drops (literally) of cleaner in the cup (it won't be visible by the time it gets to the bottom of the cup and into the feed section) and I'll store the brush until the next time.

I've had trouble with my compressors. I've bought "relatively" cheap and regretted each one. My latest acquisition (£85) is basically broken within a few months of purchase. I always use the philosophy that more expensive isn't always the best option and I've been wrong in every aspect of applying that philosophy for airbrushing. Pay the money and get a decent brush and compressor. Someone else will have to recommend a good compressor because I haven't found one yet.

I have a fume hood, but I seldom use it because of lots of reasons...too low in my current setup...too far away in my current setup...flexi hose doesn't go to an outside area anyway...makes my "painting area" even darker and harder to see...blah blah blah.

Also, I tend to do most of my modelling in the summer months where the light is good and that means I can open the doors to the garden and the windows. However, there have been times when I've not bothered and my wife has walked in and couldn't believe the stench (I didn't really notice it).

But I wouldn't argue against anyone that was telling you to get some sort of extraction system. I don't do alot of airbrushing at all...a few sessions a year. But I still feel you need to get one. You maybe don't need a hood if you're in a room that no-one else goes into and could just get a respirator...but I would say something is required and as you mentioned the basement, a hood with a filter would be a minimum option.

And some sort of eye protection would be recommended too.

Here's a video of cleaning the airbrush between paints


And here's one about stripping the airbrush down
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: Tuna on August 10, 2018, 08:16:47 PM
Thinking about getting an airbrush as well.  General question how hard/arduous is it to clean? 
Do you use multiple airbrushes or do you use one and clean between colors
What is the best compressor that is quiet
Do you need a fume hood setup or can you do this in the corner of a basement

Thanks
Con

I always mostly did Acrylics, which I figured were easier to clean. Yeah.. went into a corner of the basement, in the good weather days, I'd be next to the basement door with it open. Never got to the point of buying a 'hood'..  For the compressor question, at first, I got a lil tank. .and filled it with a hardware compressor (one you could use for filling your tires. Later I got a tank with Compressor attached.. Definitely don't go the 'can' route, that's too expensive!

Another thing about Acrylics, is the fumes aren't as 'bad'.
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: Jack Brown on August 12, 2018, 09:31:08 PM
My setup isnít exactly small, but, itís nearly silent and completely dry. Got a CO2 tank and regulator at a local welding shop. This was years ago, so, I really donít remember price. A tank will last a very long time with the low draw of an airbrush.
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: bbmike on August 25, 2018, 09:32:48 AM
What if I only plan to build a couple of models? Are there any good alternatives to airbrushing? Is there a good, inexpensive starter kit?
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: JudgeDredd on September 01, 2018, 03:57:20 PM
What if I only plan to build a couple of models? Are there any good alternatives to airbrushing? Is there a good, inexpensive starter kit?
I guess just hand painting with (I would suggest) enamels. They give a decent finish when brushing.

However, I found this online
https://www.amazon.co.uk/KKmoon-Professional-Airbrush-Painting-Manicure/dp/B01FLXZGNG/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1535840097&sr=8-6&keywords=kkmoon+airbrush

Looks decent enough and I'm getting one. Of course you'd still need a compressor and cheap ones will skin you £60+
Title: Re: Airbrush Painting
Post by: Pzrjager on September 12, 2018, 06:05:45 PM
What if I only plan to build a couple of models? Are there any good alternatives to airbrushing? Is there a good, inexpensive starter kit?

Airfix makes a lot of starter kits that include the brushes, glue, paints, and decals.

This is a good guide of if you want to build and brush paint vehicles: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4qXHjvYYmww