Author Topic: CRISIS GROGS vs GENESIS 5-player  (Read 314 times)

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Offline JasonPratt

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Re: CRISIS GROGS vs GENESIS 5-player
« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2018, 07:58:20 AM »

At 900 then:

FIRE IN THE GROGS TOO -- a four-player full team mp of GMT's Vietnam War boardgame Fire in the Lake, recreated in TTS.

Me vs Barth -- DC1: Blitz

Survive Harder! In the grim darkness of the bowl there is only, um, Amazons. And tentacles and midgets. Not remotely what you're thinking! ...okay, maybe a little remotely.

PanzOrc Corpz Generals -- Season One complete; Fantasy Wars AAR

The full pdf of Cry of Justice has been posted to the Grogheads Book category here.


Offline JasonPratt

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Re: CRISIS GROGS vs GENESIS 5-player
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2018, 12:39:38 PM »
Thank God the haiku challenge is done!

Now for the kaiju challenge: every post is a book.  :D >:D


HOW MANY PLAYERS?

We're doing the maximum number of 5. The game ships with several map scenarios and setups allowing for down to 2 players, plus a 1-player tutorial scenario featuring Sargon (which is set long before the standard events of the game.)

WHAT'S THE GAME-WINNING GOAL?

Have the most points at the end of the final turn. Alternately, eliminate the other players before the end of the final turn. (Each turn has a bunch of things for each player to do.)

HOW ARE PLAYERS ELIMINATED?

As usual, wiping their chips off the map, and also taking their home kingdom cities. One or the other won't suffice, it has to be both.

HOW ARE POINTS SCORED?

Only two ways: by building monuments in cities, and by controlling cities. Each city produces a nominal income per turn that also serves as its point value; but to count the points (and get the income) you have to be able to trace an unbroken path from the city back to your capital. (Naturally your capital usually has its own point/income value.) You can move your capital to other cities. The game requires players to start our faction(s) at particular capitals (perhaps with some variance per scenario). You can see the nominal player capitals on the map marked with a five-pointed star.


...um, here's the map again for reference. Click to embiggen.




WHAT DO THE SHAPES ON THE MAP GENERALLY MEAN?

The large spaces (circles and squares) are cities. The large grey ones are, in effect, the capitals of small independent kingdoms. The small grey circles are stopping points between cities. The brown lines between spaces are the routes. This is a point-to-point game, where travel is only capable by routes. (There are rivers and lakes on the map, but they're only there for aesthetic flavor and to help with geographic recognition.) If a space has something that looks like the three pyramids, in light brown, those are mountains, which provide various defensive bonuses. If a space has a rectangle that looks brown with a gold diagonal stripe, that's a gold/iron area: trade-route access to these points give some extra income on a semi-random basis. (3/4ths of them, you may notice, are on the Hittite side of the map, and the Hittites are the only faction that start with one in a home-kingdom city!) The dark and light blue paths on the Mediterranean are sea routes leading to port cites (marked with what looks like a lock or a tombstone, no idea why.) Dark ones are northern routes more likely to be pirated.

WHAT ARE SEA LANES FOR?

Mostly for tracing economic routes by sea instead of land. Egypt (Barth) can also move its chits around by sea, but only to areas already held by Egypt. So once Barth works his way up the Levantine coast to Tyre, he'll be able to ship pieces directly to Tyre (and vice versa) from either of his ports in one move instead of 7. (I think. I haven't studied movement costs for sea travel, because they're pointless to me: only Egypt can do it.)

WHO IS PLAYING WHAT?

Barthheart is playing Egypt, down there in, y'know, Egypt. He starts with the bright yellow cities. Dave is playing the light blue Hittites in the north-central area. (To his west is the temporary Arzawan empire, which is the largest non-player faction, in bright orange.) I'm the snotty green Mitanni dead center of the map. (To my southwest are some scattered Caananite federation alliance cities in a reddish-brown, the second-largest npc faction and not active yet.) To my immediate east is Larry (i.e. ArizonaTank) in purple Assyria. To our south is Superhaus (i.e. Rich) as Babylonia. (To his east is the nearest Elamite city in darker blue. Elam has the smallest npc faction on the map, but starts with lots of troops already ready already, and most of their empire is off-map and invulnerable. Some micro-kingdom npcs will pop up semi-randomly, too; as well as barbarian invasions from Kaska, Libya, and the sea.)

The colors, aside from visually identifying our chits, show which cities we can hold without pieces. Any city other than our color will revert back to independent (or maybe to the original player? -- need to check if it's that or indie) if we have no controlling chips there.

WHAT CHIPS CONTROL CITIES?

Infantry, chariots, and peasants. There are also slaves and kings, but they can't control cities. Peasants can be left alone to control a city and do work there, but slaves will immediately vanish if unsupervised. Barbarians and pirates can also control cities, but (except for the "Sea People") they vanish between turns. Cities can also revolt under certain conditions.

WHAT DO THE CITY SHAPES MEAN?

In effect, how many troops start off in the garrison there. Simple large circles are the basic fortified city, one garrison troop. Circles with a smaller circle are level 2. Squares are level 3. Squares with a square inside are level 4. Squares with tower-squares are level 5 -- each level adds another infantry troop in effect. City defense can be buffed up 1 level beyond its starting map level. They can also be reduced progressively in levels to level 0, unfortified (and then repaired again up to the map-level-plus-one). Cities can also be destroyed, which puts a special marker on them: they cease functioning economically and they block trade route paths in that case. But destroyed cities can be rebuilt, with lots of silver, a pair of peasants, and at least one infantry.

WHAT DO THE LITTLE GOLD DOTS NEXT TO MOST CITIES MEAN?

How much silver income the city sends back to the capital of the player who controls it. (Yes, silver income. With gold dots.  ::) ) They also represent victory points for holding a city. (Maybe those are gold?) The VPs shift down as well as up as players lose and gain territory, and gain or lose monuments for that matter. VPs are nominally counted near the end of a turn, but can be tracked as players go along, or ignored until the end of the final turn.

WHAT ARE THOSE STACKS OF COLORED CHIPS WITH THE PLAYER COLORS?

Our starting infantry allowance for this campaign. Each chip represents one-step of infantry power (more-or-less an infantry company). They can be traded in for equivalent 2- or 3- or 5- or 10- power chips, to make the stacks smaller.

This however starts getting into the actual gameplay and turn zero actions (so to speak), which I or someone else will get to later.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 07:46:34 PM by JasonPratt »
FIRE IN THE GROGS TOO -- a four-player full team mp of GMT's Vietnam War boardgame Fire in the Lake, recreated in TTS.

Me vs Barth -- DC1: Blitz

Survive Harder! In the grim darkness of the bowl there is only, um, Amazons. And tentacles and midgets. Not remotely what you're thinking! ...okay, maybe a little remotely.

PanzOrc Corpz Generals -- Season One complete; Fantasy Wars AAR

The full pdf of Cry of Justice has been posted to the Grogheads Book category here.

Offline JasonPratt

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Re: CRISIS GROGS vs GENESIS 5-player
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2018, 08:44:45 PM »
GENESIS OF THE GROGS TURN ZERO
--------------------------------------

There are up to ten turns in the game, each reflecting roughly 50 years or one generation of activity, and each turn involves several phases. But the game starts with what might be called Turn Zero, a setup period which takes the place of most of those phases in Turn One (which then skips those phases).

Here's the pregame map again for reference, essentially before Turn Zero (click to embiggen a little more).




WHAT ARE THE STACKS OF COLORED CHITS STANDING AROUND ON THE MAPS?

Those are the starting infantry of various factions. That includes two relatively large non-player factions, the orange Arzawa in (what's now) Western Turkey (near the city of Troy, notice, at the upper-left-most extent of the map), and the dark blue Elam at the far southeast. The historical start of the full campaign game designates that they get a certain number of infantry chips placed in those places.

We five players, however, are each expected to place our own infantry. We all start with slight variances in the number of available infantry, silver, and some other things. Here's my game map, for an example:



Roughly clockwise from upper left:

"Manpower Maximum" -- each of us gets a free amount of infantry at the start of each turn, but with few exceptions our number of infantry cannot exceed our manpower maximums (which as the track shows range from a 'minimum maximum' so to speak of 15 infantry, to a maximum maximum of 38.) I, the Mitanni, start with the lowest manpower maximum: I can only field 15 infantry a turn. The Hittites, for example, are the next lowest, at 16. However, in my case I'm also the only faction who starts with more infantry than my official maximum! -- I get 17 infantry. Everyone else starts at their manpower max (or maybe a little less in some cases, I forget). This represents our logistic ability to field armies. Each "infantry step" represents a large company of troops by modern standards, (roughly 500). So I've got 17 of those light-green infantry chips in a stack near my capital. Individual chips can be traded in at any time for chips representing an equivalent multiple: 2, 3, 5, or 10 infantry. (This is purely for convenience.) No one can really control the Manpower Maximum: it fluctuates randomly, usually upward.

"Army A" and "Army B" are simply containers for large stacks if I want to substitute out one simple marker for each of them. In a Vassal game this is less of an issue.

Above "Army B" is a stack labeled "kings". In Vassal that's a randomized square which deals out my ten kings randomly; but we're playing the historical setup variant so everyone will start with our first generation kings. Mine is King Kitra. I'll show him later.

"Treasury" is where, in physical play, we keep stacks of silver chits. In Vassal there's simply a toggle, plus or minus. I start with 12 silver (which also represents the economic value of my cities). Most everyone else starts with more.

"Controlled Powers" will list minor kingdoms or barbarian factions which I may get to play for a turn. No one starts off with any. These are activated by playing event cards, however.

"Chariot Technology Level" starts at zero, "no chariots", for everyone in the full campaign game. Normally whichever one of us draws and plays a chariot tech event card first will get access to chariots first (at tech level 1), but in the "historical" setup I'll automatically get chariot tech first on Turn Two; everyone else gets Chariot tech on Turn Three; and then at the start of Turn Four the remaining two chariot tech cards are shuffled into the event deck for anyone to randomly draw and play. Chariot tech not only allows players to buy and deploy chariot chits, but the higher the tech level the more effect the strength of those chips will have in an open-field fight. (Double or triple strength eventually!) Chariots can't fight in mountain terrain or during city defenses (neither on attack or on defense). Chariots provide a few other benefits, too, even at tech level one (where their strength isn't multiplied).

Finally, my mat shows I've already drawn my pre-game event card. I don't play it during the setup period however.


Starting with Egypt-Barth, and working clockwise around the map, each player draws an event card (hidden from each other), sets their manpower max and starting silver (done automatically in the Vassal mod setup), and places their starting number of infantry on the map anywhere among the home kingdom cities. (Not on transit spaces between the ciities.) The kings must start in our capitals.

Before we place our infantry, we are each allowed to freely convert as many infantry as we want into peasants, 2 peas per infantry. This is allowed during the Manpower phase at the start of each Turn from Turn Two onward, too.

WHAT ARE PEASANTS GOOD FOR?

They build cities, build monuments, rebuild destroyed cities, rebuild destroyed walls, and hold spaces under faction control outside the home kingdoms -- but they can't attack or defend, so any military pieces will overrun and destroy them automatically (usually creating slave pieces in the process. Slave pieces function like peasants but vanish if left unattended, so they can't hold territory.) Peasants can be moved around like military pieces, and with or without military pieces. (Slaves need military escort to keep them from vanishing.)

Here's a closeup of where I chose to place my starting pieces:



I placed after Barth-Egypt and Hittite-Dave (light blue, on the left), but before Assyria-Larry (purple, on my right -- you can see a lot of his placement, too) and Babylon-Rich. You may notice I chose not to convert any of my infantry to peasants. This will handicap me later, but on the other hand I can make full use of my starting 17 infantry, which I'll be forced to trim down to 15 at the start of Turn Two later (if my manpower maximum doesn't randomly increase, and far enough).

Irrite and especially Nisibis are directly vulnerable to a strike by Ass(Tank!)-Larry, who gets Shamshi-Adad the 1st, out of the gate on turn one, so I've made sure to give them lots of defense. Harran, to my west, is a launching pad for me to go after some rich areas eventually, so I (think, at first) I want a good set of infantry there -- I'll quickly rethink that plan soon! I start near the least guarded iron/gold spot on the map, Ergani, so I want Alshe ready to go with some infantry, too. In hindsight, that was dumb, but I didn't quite understand the move-cost rules yet.

My king there in my capital of Waush... Washushka... ...... Washington, is named Kirta, and he's pretty weak with 2 tactical and 2 campaign (or strategic) ratings. (The other tiny 1 means he's my first-turn historical king.) More about those numbers later.

Here's the larger map showing where everyone else chose to place their starting pieces (click to embiggen a bit).



Those five markers at left center, colored with our faction colors, reading "AM"? Those are "activation markers", and we each nominally get four of them per turn. We each contribute three of our markers to a random pot for drawing later (the grey AM stack over there), but our first rounds will always be in some clockwise order.

At the start of each turn, the player whose king that turn has the best campaign rating (the red number) -- or where there's a tie, the best die-roll -- decides which player will go first; and for our first rounds, play will run clockwise around the table from that chosen player.

But that's Turn One, which I'll get to the start of tomorrow night.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 08:51:26 PM by JasonPratt »
FIRE IN THE GROGS TOO -- a four-player full team mp of GMT's Vietnam War boardgame Fire in the Lake, recreated in TTS.

Me vs Barth -- DC1: Blitz

Survive Harder! In the grim darkness of the bowl there is only, um, Amazons. And tentacles and midgets. Not remotely what you're thinking! ...okay, maybe a little remotely.

PanzOrc Corpz Generals -- Season One complete; Fantasy Wars AAR

The full pdf of Cry of Justice has been posted to the Grogheads Book category here.

Offline JasonPratt

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Re: CRISIS GROGS vs GENESIS 5-player
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2018, 09:06:08 PM »
GENESIS OF THE GROGS TURN ONE (Action Rounds 1-4)
-----------------------------------------------------------

So as mentioned last time, the player whose king has the highest campaign (or as I prefer to call it, strategic) rating gets to decide who goes first; and whomever he chooses, everyone's first round will proceed in sequence clockwise around the table from there. For convenience, we're treating our table-positions as equivalent to our setup-order (as mandated by the setup rules for this scenario) -- which happens to be pretty much clockwise around the map anyway.

Baby-Rich starts out strongest with Hammurabi in Turn One (although some of the other kings are no slouches), so he makes the decision: and he decides he wants to go last in the initial rounds, meaning Egypt should go first. So our play in rounds 1 through five will cycle in just the same order as our setup did.

Since each round (or "activation" in this game's terms) involves up to four actions, and since nominally there are twelve such rounds in a turn, I'm going to split them up reporting our positions at the end of blocks of four. Within that I'll include any minor-nation or barbarian rounds that get played.

I won't go into detail on every action for every round; I'll probably just show the map (possibly including some errors at that time since we're all still very new at the game and learning how the rules work), and discuss broadly what everyone did or tried to do.

But for purposes of illustration on how things work, I'll go into my moves in some detail this time.

At this stage of the game, I start my round my moving my "activation marker" off its slot to the "used" box. (Later, as those chips stack up I'll rearrange them in handy columns.)

Next, if a player can't, or won't, pay one silver at the start of the round, all he can do is draw an event card and then play it if the card says he must do so. A player can always play his voluntary cards freely at other times, so long as the card-play is valid, but for his own round if he wants to play voluntary cards or do anything else he must invest $1 to begin with. So I do that: it's my first round and while I'm relatively poor, I'm not that poor. Yet. Also, I have some interesting prospects.

The first card I drew, back on Turn Zero (which I can reveal now because we're well past this point in the game), was "Tactical Surprise". This is a super-handy card for a tough expected fight, so I planned to hold onto it until I had an emergency. (It also features an illustration that looks quite like a tactical battle from Matrixlitherine's Chariots of War...  :o )

The card I draw now, starting my first round of Turn 1, is "Baal". This is a must-play card -- I have to play it when I draw it -- but fortunately this early in the game it has no effect on me: it's a tax on all the monuments I've built, and not only have I not even had the opportunity for building actions, I didn't create any peasants for building during this turn anyway! So it's a no-effect of a card that's much more problematic in the late game. Like most event cards, this simply "discards" so once the event deck has been washed through, we'll be reshuffling it back in later. In a ten-turn game we can fully expect to see it again.

Each round I can play up to four actions: a Recruit action (where I pay silver to resupply my infantry from cities outside my home kingdom, which I don't have any of yet); two Minor Actions (which mostly focus on peasants I won't have at all this turn); and a Major Move. I (representing any player of course) can take these actions in any order I wish, as long as I completely finish one action before starting another, and as long as I don't use a given chip on more than one "move" action.

My Minor Actions can be Minor Moves, and as I cast an eye over where I assigned starting troops, I realize I've left the city of Irrite a little less defended from Assy Aggression than Nisibis. Here's a map again for reference (click as usual to embiggen a bit):



That's because Nisibis (which will someday, long in the future, be the home of the first medical university in western history, possibly in world history depending on what the Chinese will be doing between now and then -- set up as part of moving one of the first four key Christian catechetical universities out from Edessa) is a level 3 city, and Irrite is only level 2. This can be seen visually by the difference in shape: Nisibis is a square, and Irrite is a circle within a circle. (A simple circle is level 1.) Each level effectively provides one infantry for garrison. So in effect, although I assigned equal infantries from my army to each city, Nisibis has 8 infantry power and Irrite only has seven.

Thus, for my first action, I declare a Minor Action to be a Minor Move, and I designate one of my infantry chips in Hurran, the 'square' city one space west of Irrite.

The game rules, and playbook, and errata, are surprisingly vague about what a minor move can and cannot do, but after hashing it out for several rounds (after this one) we landed on minor moves necessarily involving one-and-only-one unit.

Normally at this point I would roll 1d6 to see how many movement points this one infantry captain can spend on his move, but I'm only moving one space anyway. He joins the guard at Irrite.

Now however, looking over Larry's Assyrian setup, I'm worried that he might pick up a larger stack to go after Nisibis to start with; whereas if he plans to go for Irrite, he'll have to take the long way around and he'd waste movement points hiking up to Nineveh first to pick up some extra infantry there. Assyria crippling the Mitanni early, one way or another, is a legitimate first turn strategy (which kind of happened historically, too, which is why many of you might never have heard of the Mitanni before -- I hadn't!)

I have good reason to be concerned, so I spend my second and last Minor Action this round rolling up another Minor Move for another one of my infantries in Harran: I roll a 4, which is plenty to get that chip to Nisibis.

Time for my Major Move. For a Major Move (...echo?!) the player can designate as many chips as he wants as his Force for the move, for free, as long as they're all in one space together. Otherwise, a "force" has to pay 1 silver each time it wants to pick up pieces in a space (but can pick up any number for that silver).

As it happens, I really have Harran, Irrite, and Nisibis garrisoned up the way I want now, so I'm ready to roll up to try claiming those gold mines in Ergani -- and also claim its strong 3-economy! (And its 3 victory points!) It's a weak level-1 city, making it one smart first-round move choice.

My King, Kirta, might not be great, but he does add extra punch and extra movement to a Force, so even though I had to start him (per the setup rules) in my capital, I should try to use him in the assault if I can. So I designate him alone (since no one else is in Wak... Walk... .... Wichita) with him, as my Force for my Major Move, and roll for movement points: 2. Drat. But he adds another 2 mp thanks to his red "2" on his chip, so that's 4mp total for him and anyone else he stacks with along the way.

Kings have a special move rule, where they only have to pay 1 mp and then they're free to move as far as they want during the move action -- as long as they're by themselves. If they pick up anyone to stack with, they have to pay the usual price of 1 mp per space (or 2 mp in mountains, if I recall correctly, but I'm not moving that far anyway).

So I pay 1 mp to get him going (4-1=3mp), and move him up to Alshe. There I pay another mp (3-1=2) to pick up as many pieces there as I want, which in this case will be all three infantry companies. Alshe is in my home kingdom, so I can leave it alone and not worry about losing control there. (Usually...?!)

I pay another mp to move them up to Ergani, and my final mp to launch an attack. I can attack as many times as I can, and want, to pay movement points for (with some extra movement costs depending on some battle results); but in this case I can only afford one attack this round.



Here I am, oppressing that poor little city instead of being diplomatic and nice. Genesis was a brutal time y'all.

Battles work, very basically, this way: I roll 1d6, and that's the percentage of casualties I caused (10% to 60%). The other guy does the same, and that's what he causes me in return.

In this case, I roll 3 for me and 3 for him: we give each other 30 percent casualties.

The tactical difference comes in a dice-shift system. The player with the most tactical advantage gains "shifts". Tactical advantages can tally up a number of different ways, but only the two most basic ways count here: my battle power, with 3 infantry, outnumbers his 1-infantry wall garrison 3:1, so I get 3 / 1 = 3 shifts from that. Moreover, my king may suck but he still has a tactical rating of 2 which adds another 2 shifts, for a total of 5 shifts. The side with the most shifts gets to apply the net balance of shifts.

Independent city-states like Ergani here rarely ever get shifts at all. He might have been in a mountain defense, which would grant him some shifts, but the net difference would still be in my favor; just not as much. (If non-player cities outnumber player shifts somehow, because the player was dumb enough to let that happen, I think the next player clockwise, Larry in my case, gets to tactically assign those shifts for them.)

Those five shifts allow me to "shift" either or both of the dice rolls, one notch per dice per shift, my choice. In this case I need to give him 50% casualties to knock out his lone defender, so I shift my caused casualties up two notches (from 3 to 5); and I use my remaining 3 shifts to totally negate the casualties he caused me (from 30% to 0%).

A city typically doesn't fall until their walls are down, and that's true here: the city is now level-0. It isn't destroyed -- I'd have to pay movement points to do that, which I don't want to and wouldn't have points remaining to do anyway. It still exists and functions as a city, and I'll get benefits from it as long as I keep at least one peasant or infantry there (and I have no peasants this turn). But it no longer has any walls, so no inherent garrison, so its defense score or status is 0. Thus I place a DS marker rating of 0 there. (The screenshot won't show this well, so I'll wait to post an overview next.)

Any battle a king participates has some chance to kill him. I won this fight (5 to 0, after my shifts), so my king will only die if I roll boxcars on a 2d6. Which... to be honest I think I forgot to do this round, but I do the next round and he's fine. Had I lost the fight, snake eyes would also kill him. A king dying doesn't end the game for that faction, but without his tactical and strategic ratings they can't be as punchy. Even a sucky king, like Egypt-Barth's this turn (even suckier than mine, at 1-1!) is better than no king.

I also get to plunder the city, since I'm not reclaiming one of my home kingdom cities: half of the 3 economy (those three gold dots next to it), rounded up. So I get 2 silver. Profit!  :coolsmiley: It'll also send me 3 silver at the start of each turn, so long as I keep it. But I'll have to leave a piece there to keep it, and in any case anyone could just walk right in and take the place with no walls. And I have no way to build more walls there (or anywhere else) right now.

The "gold" marker next to the city only counts if I play a Gold event card, but that's possible now, even if very unlikely overall. Mainly I wanted the 3 silver income. And the 2 plunder. And the 3 victory points.

Now I can also play my one Recruit action per round. Recruit allows me to buy up to two infantry per city outside my kingdom, but they spawn in those cities, and they cost 1 silver per infantry. I definitely want that. And hey, I happen to have 2 extra silver just recently!  :D Essentially, I said "Hey, we're neighbors, right? How about I don't plunder you, and you sign up for my army instead, deal?" Deal. I add 2 more infantry companies to that space.

Those are all my actions, and that ends my first round this turn.

« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 06:11:00 PM by JasonPratt »
FIRE IN THE GROGS TOO -- a four-player full team mp of GMT's Vietnam War boardgame Fire in the Lake, recreated in TTS.

Me vs Barth -- DC1: Blitz

Survive Harder! In the grim darkness of the bowl there is only, um, Amazons. And tentacles and midgets. Not remotely what you're thinking! ...okay, maybe a little remotely.

PanzOrc Corpz Generals -- Season One complete; Fantasy Wars AAR

The full pdf of Cry of Justice has been posted to the Grogheads Book category here.

Offline JasonPratt

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Re: CRISIS GROGS vs GENESIS 5-player
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2018, 09:21:04 PM »
As I said, I won't go into anything like that detail (probably) in future reports, but I wanted to give an idea of what we're all doing when we play our rounds.

Here's the overmap after the end of AM4 (activation marker 4, or round 4), Assyria-Larry's first round this turn:



Eg-Barth, the yellow egg guys down in eggland there, started his peasants on some monuments (which have to be paid for twice, to be completed, and not on the same round) -- you probably can't quite see the construction markers because he's got peasants and/or infantry stacked on top of them. He also marched his nearly worthless Pharaoh, Merneferre Ay, in an infantry stack to Gaza, and bounced off it, doing some damage to its walls. You can see the DS1 marker there now, showing damaged walls. In effect it's a level-one city now. Egypt has a nicely defensive tucked position with room to expand, but the downside is that they only have one direction to expand and that always necessarily starts with Gaza. (They can move troops by sea once they secure a port, but can't invade that way.)

Egypt is also unlucky this turn because Larry drew and played the Canaan activation event, which drops infantry into the four brown Canaan cities. It happens to be much worse than it looks, because Larry was really supposed to drop FOUR INFANTRY PER CITY, not four total one in each city. The only good news is that Larry decided not to use them to soften up the area, just as a buffer against Egyptian expansion this turn; and they'll disappear as the turn ends.

Hits-Dave, in light blue, took his King Labarna and an infantry stack, up north to the small mountain town of Sapinuwa, but despite outnumbering them and having a strongly tactical king, he bounced off their mountain defenses somewhat. They're damaged, but also punched out some of his infantry, so he continued his move with his king (having rolled high mp and his king granting more) down to pick up some more infantry reserves and bring them back for next round. Dave also had the foresight to bring some peasants along to start repairing the city once he takes it: the main point to doing this is to buff up defenses a little against a Kaskar invasion, and earn some vp and silver per turn while doing so.

Dave also started a ton of monument building, since he converted heavily into peasants this turn.

Assyria-Larry, to my right in purple, decided that Assy Aggression meant waving their naked butts in my face (his description!  :o ) and surged south toward Babylon's borders instead, to take Samarra, which he succeeded at (because he's Hammurabi some king almost as ass-kickery as Hammurabi with a super-stack). The city walls are down to 0 but you can't currently see that under his stack; I'll try to remember to adjust things better for a snapshot next time. Instead of starting a monument, he paid his peasants to brick up Assur's defenses one level -- I'll try to get a better snapshot of that next time, too. Each city has a natural maximum defense rating, and all cities are presumed to start the game there, but any city can be beefed up one (but only one) notch beyond their inherent maximum level.


Babylon-Rich will be Round 5, after which we'll start drawing rounds randomly. We'll see how that turned out, in my next coming entry (unless Barth or someone beats me to it first. ;) )
« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 09:26:35 PM by JasonPratt »
FIRE IN THE GROGS TOO -- a four-player full team mp of GMT's Vietnam War boardgame Fire in the Lake, recreated in TTS.

Me vs Barth -- DC1: Blitz

Survive Harder! In the grim darkness of the bowl there is only, um, Amazons. And tentacles and midgets. Not remotely what you're thinking! ...okay, maybe a little remotely.

PanzOrc Corpz Generals -- Season One complete; Fantasy Wars AAR

The full pdf of Cry of Justice has been posted to the Grogheads Book category here.

Offline JasonPratt

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Re: CRISIS GROGS vs GENESIS 5-player
« Reply #20 on: February 13, 2018, 04:54:08 PM »
GENESIS OF THE GROGS TURN ONE (Action Rounds 5-8)
-----------------------------------------------------------

So, let's see if I can get through this summary post without completely losing my mind over imagining that Assyria-Larry has an even stronger king than he already does!  :crazy2:

Here's the map at the end of Round 8:



It's Babylonia-Rich who has Hammurabi, and he chose to go last out of our first set of rounds, so he wastes no time trundling up to Sippat (one space north of his capital of Babylon), smacking that level-3 city down, and then actually rebuilding its walls to full strength again so that he can glare at Larry's king Shamshi Adad I.

Once Rich plays his first round, we start drawing Activation Markers from the grey-backed pile (over to the middle-left on the map), to see who randomly gets a turn; which happened to be Assyria-Larry (again), Egypt-Barth, and then Assyria-Larry again.

Along the way, Larry lucked out in drawing a must-play barbarian invasion card and then rolling for a much more bothersome crew than the Canaanites, the Sea Peoples (some of whom will later apparently team with Syro-Phoenician traders from Tyre and Sidon to become the Philistines and, much farther to the west, Carthage.) This gives Larry an extra round to use them to harass anyone with a coastal presence, and as indeed happened historically he chose Egypt. You can see the SeaPeep results down to the southwest: they took over Sais, and Barth had to cancel one of his monuments (in Thebes, although this mapshot doesn't happen to show the construction canceled yet) to rush a peasant group to Memphis to boost everyone's morale with barbeque and bluegrass. And extra defensive towers (thus the DS+1 chip you may be able to see down there under the infantry.)

Fortunately but also unfortunately for Barth, the Sea People only have one path out of the area, and that's to plow straight through most or all of his cities; also, by mistake only a weaker surge of Sea People arrived. Unlike other barbarians, Sea People stay on the map between turns until combat or isolation dissolve them. But they'll get a random activation chip of their own in the pile now, so Larry will be able to manipulate them for one more round this turn -- at least! Because if a barbarian invasion card is played again and they're rolled again, they'll get reinforcements in cities they've conquered a foothold in: and next time (which should have been the first time) there will be more of them with a stronger king!

Barth does finish taking Gaza, however, so he has that going for him.

On Assy-Larry's 2nd and 3rd rounds, he rebuilds the walls at Samarra (there's a chip showing broken level-2 walls, but the city has a natural maximum of level-2 so the chip doesn't have to be there anymore), and continues south to smash through Dur Karigalzu (gesundheit!) so that he and Hammurabi, whom I keep mistaking the Assy king for, can glare more efficiently at each other. Where he and Baby-Rich will go from here, who can say?!

(Well, I could say: I'm waiting for Turn 12 to finish playing out, but I'll report that later. ;) )

Since Hittite-Dave and Mitanni-me didn't get our activation markers drawn, we're still stuck where we were, for now; although Assyria, if I recall correctly, stole my tactical card using a traitor event; which he hasn't played yet, so that's something Rich had better watch out for!

Once we finish Round 12, soon, I'll post the next catchup report.
FIRE IN THE GROGS TOO -- a four-player full team mp of GMT's Vietnam War boardgame Fire in the Lake, recreated in TTS.

Me vs Barth -- DC1: Blitz

Survive Harder! In the grim darkness of the bowl there is only, um, Amazons. And tentacles and midgets. Not remotely what you're thinking! ...okay, maybe a little remotely.

PanzOrc Corpz Generals -- Season One complete; Fantasy Wars AAR

The full pdf of Cry of Justice has been posted to the Grogheads Book category here.

Offline JasonPratt

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Re: CRISIS GROGS vs GENESIS 5-player
« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2018, 01:55:10 PM »
GENESIS OF THE GROGS TURN ONE (Action Rounds 9-12)
-----------------------------------------------------------

If you multiply out 5 players by 4 rounds each, and then add a couple more activation markers for the Canaanites and the Sea People, you can tell we're passing the halfway point of Turn One here.

This was, in order, Hittite-Dave; Egypt-Barth; Mi(tan)ni-Me; and then Assyria-Larry. We really should be on AM 13, because somewhere back among Rounds 5 thru 12, Larry drew the Canaanites' activation marker. But he decided not to play them, since all they could do would be to knock down a few walls and then disappear at the end of the Turn, making expansion easier for Barth and/or me (and/or maybe Dave) in Turn Two.

(Come to think of it, there are 14 Activation Markers out there, so this should really be AM 14. I don't know how we got off count, but I'm going to provisionally suppose I'm to blame since I started our save-file nomenclature for better sorting purposes.  :crazy2: )

Here are the results:




Hits-Dave finished taking that border city between him and the Kaska barbarians, and also finished one of the monuments he had started on his first round: the first completed monument in our game!  :clap: As long as it's in one piece, it'll give a VP to whomever controls it there in Amkuwa.

Eg-Bart bustled down to Eliat, and took that city, since his pharaoh's stack was going to be far from defending Memphis anyway, and with Sais currently lost (even destroyed) Barth will need supplementary income just to stay close to even next Turn. This was made worse by him drawing, and having to play, the Astarte event: a devastating card for a player early in the game, which forced him to pay silver for every town in his home kingdom that didn't have a monument yet. Which currently is all his cities. What's worse, Sais still counts even though currently destroyed and in the hands of the Sea People! (That's why there's a silver marker next to the city; to remind Barth to pay for that one, too. In his defense, the card text wasn't totally explicit about this nuance.)

Mi'ni-me left behind a troop to keep holding my prize of Ergani, but I rolled small on my Major Move and couldn't get my king's stack anywhere useful. They're poised at Harran, on my western border, ready to move one of two directions on my next round.

Assy-Larry's peasants bulked up Ninevah further against possible assault from me later, and recruited some foreign aid from his conquered city (I did, too), but decided not to go anywhere farther this round -- not least because he has run out of silver! But also because this was his fourth and final round this Turn, and he didn't want to leave his new possession unguarded with Rich just next door and with three whole rounds still remaining to play.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2018, 01:59:06 PM by JasonPratt »
FIRE IN THE GROGS TOO -- a four-player full team mp of GMT's Vietnam War boardgame Fire in the Lake, recreated in TTS.

Me vs Barth -- DC1: Blitz

Survive Harder! In the grim darkness of the bowl there is only, um, Amazons. And tentacles and midgets. Not remotely what you're thinking! ...okay, maybe a little remotely.

PanzOrc Corpz Generals -- Season One complete; Fantasy Wars AAR

The full pdf of Cry of Justice has been posted to the Grogheads Book category here.