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Role-Playing & Adventure Gaming / Re: D&D Core Books
« Last post by Bison on Today at 05:09:52 AM »
My current favorite game mechanic in 5e is passive checks.  (I know its been done in other games too.)

You can use them for every stat.  Stuck door?  Strong character can force open no effort, but weaker character cannot.  Trap? High perception. Hey its a trap!  Low perception?  Oh, shit I set off a trap.    No dice rolls for skill checks unless actively performing a specific task like searching for traps.

Rules based for more rule-centric gamer. The older kid likes to read the rules, therefore rules are very important to follow.  How come she saw the trap and I didn't?  Passive wisdom check...  Ok.

This all creates an easy means to distinguish between character traits and setup moments the DM wants to have an undetermined or more challenging success/fail outcomes. 
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Role-Playing & Adventure Gaming / Re: D&D Core Books
« Last post by Bison on Today at 04:53:22 AM »
I run Forgotten Realms with the vast majority of the world as being currently unsettled.  Once you move beyond the immediate influence of the regional city state or the boundaries of internally weakly aligned kingdoms, the world is anarchic.  The one foundation of FR that I really like is that massive and powerful kingdoms have risen and fallen over the millennia.  Lot's of great story lines and adventure locations can be created and explored.

Some day I'll play a Ravenloft campaign, but the way I'd like to run it is too dark for kids.  I have a bunch of Dragon Lance material, which I may bring out and play at some point too.  Great thing about RPGs is that old material can always be revitalized.

 
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Role-Playing & Adventure Gaming / Re: D&D Core Books
« Last post by airboy on Yesterday at 08:00:43 PM »
I had all of the original Gazetteers and ended up selling them on ebay.

When I retire and restart my RPG D&D and Call of Cthulhu stuff, I'll probably go back to playing the Judges Guild world.  It is truly massive and is mostly wildnerness.  I like a lot of chaos and rumor in my worlds, and I've found the D&D worlds to be too settled and organized for my taste.
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Role-Playing & Adventure Gaming / Re: D&D Core Books
« Last post by MetalDog on Yesterday at 07:29:31 PM »
I had heard rumor that 5e was going to revisit the Known World setting.  So I have gone back to the Thyatis and Alphatia boxed set, Dawn of the Emperors along with the three or four Gazetteers I have.  Even pulled out my Keep on the Borderlands and Isle of Dread modules to give them a look.
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Role-Playing & Adventure Gaming / Re: D&D Core Books
« Last post by Bison on Yesterday at 07:14:35 PM »
Personally, I'm running a home brew variant of Forgotten Realms.  The major reason being a lack of time to devout to creating a number of things that I want in a world political organizations, secret societies, and maps.  I haven't read any Forgotten Realms novels in years, so I'm actually pretty unaware of the written history and lore.  The Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide is the perfect level of setting building for me.  It gives a nice once over the world and more specifics on parts of the Sword Coast, but not a ton of details and lore.  And there are thousands of maps online for the Forgotten Realms.  There's always a new place to go and build our story, so it's a really good fit for us.  Right now we are running a through the beginner's box quest Lost Mine of Phandelver, which is actually a really good pre-gen module.  However, I've taken quite a bit of liberty with the adventure and am making tie ins with Horde of the Dragon Queen and the character backgrounds to create our world.
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Role-Playing & Adventure Gaming / Re: D&D Core Books
« Last post by airboy on Yesterday at 03:16:38 PM »
The first section of the DM guide tries to get the DM to consider the type of world they want to run.  This includes how magic heavy, how god interfering, technology, how much order (wilderness/civilization), etc..... 

The first sections also get the DM to think through how much mystery (unknown in the world), combat heavy, role playing, give away treasure, etc...  they want.

The whole set-up of the 5e is to encourage the DM to decide the type of world they want and then make decisions accordingly.

2 thoughts

1.  There's a lot of that detail in the Fantasy Hero sourcebook for Hero/GURPS from 25 years ago.

2.  "get the DM to consider the type of world they want to run" - uh...  ask the players?  I hope they mention it!


:)

They discuss what your players want to do at length.

And the 5e is not really claiming something new.  5e is after all 40 years or so after the advent of RPGs.  Not like they needed to reinvent the wheel or discover some great unknown elements of RPGs.
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Role-Playing & Adventure Gaming / Re: D&D Core Books
« Last post by bayonetbrant on Yesterday at 11:15:46 AM »
The first section of the DM guide tries to get the DM to consider the type of world they want to run.  This includes how magic heavy, how god interfering, technology, how much order (wilderness/civilization), etc..... 

The first sections also get the DM to think through how much mystery (unknown in the world), combat heavy, role playing, give away treasure, etc...  they want.

The whole set-up of the 5e is to encourage the DM to decide the type of world they want and then make decisions accordingly.

2 thoughts

1.  There's a lot of that detail in the Fantasy Hero sourcebook for Hero/GURPS from 25 years ago.

2.  "get the DM to consider the type of world they want to run" - uh...  ask the players?  I hope they mention it!


:)
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Role-Playing & Adventure Gaming / Re: D&D Core Books
« Last post by airboy on Yesterday at 10:09:43 AM »
A couple of observations on 5e.

The first section of the DM guide tries to get the DM to consider the type of world they want to run.  This includes how magic heavy, how god interfering, technology, how much order (wilderness/civilization), etc..... 

The first sections also get the DM to think through how much mystery (unknown in the world), combat heavy, role playing, give away treasure, etc...  they want.

The whole set-up of the 5e is to encourage the DM to decide the type of world they want and then make decisions accordingly.

If I wanted a "roll play" game I would just stick with computer gaming.  Live RPGs benefit from actual role-playing - at least that is what is fun to me.  I am not that interested in a system where the dice rolls determine everything.  I also don't want a world where the players know everything and everything is a very straight black/white existance.  I'm also not intersted in a rules heavy tactical combat game.

But people who want a tactical combat game roll play are just fine with me - but that is not something I would like to devote a huge amount of time to.

When I play Call of Cthulhu my characters usually follow whatever motivation seems reasonable to me.  That frequently works out to my character encountering so much weirdness that they disengage and go for help (or more friends with guns).  When I'm designing Call of Cthulhu scenarios, I'm trying hard to give each player a different motivation to unravel the mystery.  Otherwise, the "rational" player who sees too much weirdness and murder will either run away and say nothing, or run away and seek help from the authorities.  I've designed a lot of player hooks including:
a] care for the poor
b] care for the town
c] religious motivation to fight evil
d] "captain america" motivation to protect the innocent
e] insane level curiosity
f] insane level greed
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Modelling and Miniatures / Re: Sniper position created
« Last post by mirth on Yesterday at 06:21:41 AM »
Outstanding!  O0
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Modelling and Miniatures / Re: Sniper position created
« Last post by Staggerwing on Yesterday at 06:21:21 AM »
Very nice!
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