Old School Tactical Volume 1  Reprint

The Tuesday Interview – Command Post Games

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Marshall Barrington gives us an extended low-down on Command Post Games ~

Jim Owczarski, 7 March 2017

I first caught wind of Command Post Games via its Kickstarter for Pub Battles: Brandywine.  Here was a war game played on a period map, made of canvas no less, with blocks that looked an awful lot like kriegsspiel pieces, and that trumpeted that it had fewer than five pages of rules.  That, a beautiful brass measuring compass, and, oh yes, their kriegsspiel dice, made me a pretty quick fan.

Given all this, I decided to ask CPG’s Marshall Barrington about the company’s past, its future plans, and what it has against the the Little Corporal.

Yvonne Sparrowsmith

Yvonne Sparrowsmith

So, following form, could you introduce yourselves? Who is Command Post Games and what do each of you do?

  • Yvonne (aka god):  She is the primary owner/investor.  She inspired us setup and run our first Kickstarter!  She helps with web sites and PR.
  • Aaron Wood:  Graphic Design.  He does amazing work.  He is a true artist.  Excellent at picking out colors, shapes, and overall themes.
  • Marshall:  Game Design, Development, Shipping, marketing, and anything else that just needs to get done!
  • Elijah Dicks:  History Department at Arapahoe Community College.  He has been key in getting the new mega game format going.
  • Michael Sparrow:  Coordinating and running events and meetup group promotion.  He’s also helping us with new mega games.

 

Gaming Nostalgia – MB GameMaster Boxes

#TBT at GrogHeads!

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These big-box classics (mostly) still stand the test of time as games.


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The Tuesday Interview – Glenn Drover

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Friend-of-Grog Glenn Drover comes back for another visit ~

Michael Eckenfels, 28 February 2017

What’s the craziest move you ever tried to pull off in a wargame?

GD:  I’m an aggressive attacker, but never crazy. 😉

What wargame made you want to be a designer?

GD:  It is probably the fault of a whole group of games that I loved in the mid-late 70’s. From Milton Bradley: Carrier Strike, Skirmish, and Battle Cry; as well as Avalon Hill’s Tactics II and Third Reich. I played these endlessly with my dad and solo.

A Look at the Playthrough Gaming Convention

We sortied out to the local game convention for a load of photos, and more ~

Brant Guillory, 26 February 2017Playthrough-Logo

Raleigh, NC has a pretty thriving game community – 2 local colleges have digital game design programs, there are at least 4 pretty active game clubs, and all three major game stores are packed most nights for any combination of D&D Encounters, minis warfare, Friday Night .\\agic, or general board gaming.  The Triangle Simulation Society runs 2 minis-focused conventions each year, but this year the Playthrough Gaming Convention took over one of the exhibit halls at the Raleigh Convention for a weekend of digital, tabletop, and live-action gaming, as well as seminars, tournaments, and a costume contest.

Looking over the gaming hall. Booths in the front, video games on the right, and tabletops in the back.

Looking over the gaming hall. Booths in the front, video games on the right, and tabletops in the back.

Impressions of Strategic Command 3

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And… a comparison with Strategic Command WW1 Breakthrough ~

Boggit, 23 February 2017

Developed by Fury Software, and Published by Slitherine

About three years ago I did a detailed review of Fury Software’s Strategic Command WW1: Breakthrough and ended up recommending it as “not only highly playable but also a very deep, subtle and immersive game.” What, I wonder, has Fury Software been doing since? Well, they’ve spent a couple of years working on their new WW2 game – Strategic Command WW2: War in Europe, and have changed their publisher.

So what’s it like?

The first thing to hit me between the eyes is the artwork. In comparison to SCWW1: Breakthrough, Strategic Command WW2 looks like a different game. Of course it is, but in comparison the artwork is stunning, and that includes the map, the counters, and the event notifications. It is a dramatic improvement.

 

The old style artwork…

The old style artwork…

Gaming Nostalgia – Marine: 2002

#TBT at GrogHeads!

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Remember when the 2000’s were the time when we’d all be living in space?


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The Tuesday Interview – Nikolai & George from Sovereignty

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The guys from the latest Matrix Game 4x hit stop in to chat about their new release. ~

Brant Guillory, 21 February 2017

So it’s not like the world is lacking for 4X games.  What made you think “the world needs this game?” and how did you get that vision from inception to the full release of Sovereignty?

Nikolai Soderstrom (Designer): To be honest, I don’t really consider this a 4x game. We certainly didn’t go into it thinking we needed to create a 4x game. I mostly consider Sovereignty an accessible turn-based strategy game. Manage your kingdom. Go to war. Fight battles on the tactical map.

Our inspiration is deeply rooted in the grand campaign worlds of Greyhawk, Forgotten Realms, Birthright, in Middle Earth, and in historical settings to craft a rich political and cultural landscape in which to set a strategy game. In Sovereignty, you can play any one of 34 different realms, and each one is unique. We wanted the rich cultures established in the lore to resonate in the gameplay itself. Each realm has its own playstyle, its own ambitions, fears and rivalries, its own unique units, spell repertoire, agents, economy, diplomatic position, and heroes.

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Facebook Loses Oculus VR Lawsuit

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VR Gaming might stall as a result ~

Cliff George, 20 February 2017

fblogoFacebook has established themselves as one of the leading social media giants of the 21st century. Mark Zuckerberg and his team have made it a top priority to purchase other companies and make acquisitions in ways they see benefiting the overall success of their company. This business mentality has led them to make some historic purchases – such as Instagram and Whatsapp that were bought for $1 billion and $19 billion, respectively. However, one of Facebook’s more recent acquisitions involving Oculus VR got them into a sticky lawsuit.

Mark Zuckerberg made a clear indication of Facebook’s future direction with the purchase of Oculus VR in 2014 for $2 billion. The technology company is known for their creation of Oculus Rift, a high-tech Virtual Reality simulator. What Facebook saw as a worthwhile investment has turned out to be nothing more than a thorn in their side.